seamstress


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seam·stress

 (sēm′strĭs)
n.
A woman who sews, especially one who makes her living by sewing.

seamstress

(ˈsɛmstrɪs) or rarely

sempstress

n
(Knitting & Sewing) a woman who sews and makes clothes, esp professionally

seam•stress

(ˈsim strɪs; esp. Brit. ˈsɛm-)

n.
a woman who sews, esp. one whose occupation is sewing.
[1605–15]
usage: See -ess.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.seamstress - someone who makes or mends dressesseamstress - someone who makes or mends dresses  
garment worker, garmentmaker, garment-worker - a person who makes garments
Translations
خَيّاطَه
švadlena
syerske
saumakona
bayan terzi

seamstress

[ˈsemstrɪs] Ncosturera f

seamstress

[ˈsiːmstrəs] (old-fashioned) ncouturière f

seamstress

nNäherin f

seamstress

[ˈsɛmstrɪs] nsarta

seam

(siːm) noun
1. the line formed by the sewing together of two pieces of cloth etc.
2. the line where two things meet or join. Water was coming in through the seams of the boat.
3. a thin line or layer of coal etc in the earth. a coal seam.
verb
to sew a seam in. I've pinned the skirt together but I haven't seamed it yet.
ˈseamstress (ˈsemstrəs) , (ˈsiːmstrəs) noun
a woman who earns her living by sewing.
the seamy side (of life)
the roughest, most unpleasant side or aspect of human life.
References in classic literature ?
Mother, I think we might do first rate, if you could get a place as cook, and I as chambermaid or seamstress, in some family.
From the farmer-general of seventy, whose riches could not buy his life, to the seamstress of twenty, whose poverty and obscurity could not save her.
The fact is, then, Senor Don Quixote, that though you see me seated in this chair, here in the middle of the kingdom of Aragon, and in the attire of a despised outcast duenna, I am from the Asturias of Oviedo, and of a family with which many of the best of the province are connected by blood; but my untoward fate and the improvidence of my parents, who, I know not how, were unseasonably reduced to poverty, brought me to the court of Madrid, where as a provision and to avoid greater misfortunes, my parents placed me as seamstress in the service of a lady of quality, and I would have you know that for hemming and sewing I have never been surpassed by any all my life.
The citizen made a fresh pause and continued, "I have a wife who is seamstress to the queen, monsieur, and who is not deficient in either virtue or beauty.
Martha had earned her bread sometimes as a seamstress, sometimes as help to a farmer's wife, sometimes as school-mistress of the village children, sometimes as a nurse or watcher of the sick, thus acquiring a varied experience, the ultimate use of which she little anticipated.
In our ranks the rich maiden and the poor seamstress may walk arm in arm.
Yet I know she got it out from Worth only two years ago, because my seamstress always goes in to make over her Paris dresses before she wears them.
Her face is thin and worn, and she has coarse, red hands, all pricked by the needle, for she is a seamstress.
She spends the forenoon in what she calls doing nothing, which may consist in stitching so hard that you would swear she was an over-worked seamstress at it for her life, or you will find her on a table with nails in her mouth, and anon she has to be chased from the garret (she has suddenly decided to change her curtains), or she is under the bed searching for band-boxes and asking sternly where we have put that bonnet.
Or perhaps she is her own seamstress, and puts in little tucks of herself.
But in the end the condemned man found his executioner in the form of a slender girl of seventeen, Madeline Provence, who, to accomplish her purpose, served two years in his palace as a seamstress to the household.
It isn't so easy for a girl like Flora de Barral to become a factory hand, a pathetic seamstress or even a barmaid.