seated


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seat

 (sēt)
n.
1.
a. Something, such as a chair or bench, that may be sat on: There are comfortable seats in the waiting room.
b. The part on which one rests in sitting: the seat of a chair; a bicycle seat.
2.
a. A place in which one may sit: found a seat on the floor.
b. The right to occupy such a place or a ticket indicating this right: got seats for the concert.
3.
a. The buttocks.
b. The part of a garment that covers the buttocks.
4.
a. A part serving as the base of something else.
b. The surface or part on which another part sits or rests.
5.
a. The place where something is located or based: The heart is the seat of the emotions.
b. A center of authority; a capital: the county seat.
6. A place of abode or residence, especially a large house that is part of an estate: the squire's country seat.
7. Membership in an organization, such as a legislative body or stock exchange, that is obtained by appointment, election, or purchase.
8. The manner of sitting on a horse: a rider with a good seat.
v. seat·ed, seat·ing, seats
v.tr.
1.
a. To place in or on a seat.
b. To cause or assist to sit down: The ushers will seat the members of the bride's family.
2. To provide with a particular seat: The usher seated me in the back row.
3. To have or provide seats for: We can seat 300 in the auditorium.
4. To install in a position of authority or eminence.
5. To fix firmly in place: seat an ammunition clip in an automatic rifle.
v.intr.
To rest on or fit into another part: The O-rings had not seated correctly in their grooves.
Idiom:
by the seat of (one's) pants Informal
1. In a manner based on intuition and experience rather than method: He ran the business by the seat of his pants.
2. Without the use of instruments: an inexperienced pilot who had to fly the aircraft by the seat of her pants.

[Middle English sete, probably from Old Norse sæti; see sed- in Indo-European roots.]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.seated - (of persons) having the torso erect and legs bent with the body supported on the buttocks; "the seated Madonna"; "the audience remained seated"
standing - (of persons) on the feet; having the torso in an erect position supported by straight legs; "standing room only"
References in classic literature ?
For two or three hours the sun lay warmly in the high window, showing Jo seated on the old sofa, writing busily, with her papers spread out upon a trunk before her, while Scrabble, the pet rat, promenaded the beams overhead, accompanied by his oldest son, a fine young fellow, who was evidently very proud of his whiskers.
Gripping George by the shoulder and pulling him to his feet, he held him with one hand while he looked at Belle Carpenter seated on the grass.
But after the men came in from the fields, and we were all seated at the supper table, then she asked Jake about the old place and about our friends and neighbours there.
He had been seated before the door of the main house.
Erect, his stature surpassed that of his fellows; though seated, he appeared reduced within the ordinary limits of the race.
For, when the line is darting out, to be seated then in the boat, is like being seated in the midst of the manifold whizzings of a steam-engine in full play, when every flying beam, and shaft, and wheel, is grazing you.
It was hard upon high noon; and Ahab, seated in the bows of his high-hoisted boat, was about taking his wonted daily obervation of the sun to determine his latitude.
Those who are seated in the carriage do not observe that they are doing down a declivity of twenty to twenty-five degrees
Be seated somewhere; and until you can speak pleasantly, remain silent.