seats


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seat

 (sēt)
n.
1.
a. Something, such as a chair or bench, that may be sat on: There are comfortable seats in the waiting room.
b. The part on which one rests in sitting: the seat of a chair; a bicycle seat.
2.
a. A place in which one may sit: found a seat on the floor.
b. The right to occupy such a place or a ticket indicating this right: got seats for the concert.
3.
a. The buttocks.
b. The part of a garment that covers the buttocks.
4.
a. A part serving as the base of something else.
b. The surface or part on which another part sits or rests.
5.
a. The place where something is located or based: The heart is the seat of the emotions.
b. A center of authority; a capital: the county seat.
6. A place of abode or residence, especially a large house that is part of an estate: the squire's country seat.
7. Membership in an organization, such as a legislative body or stock exchange, that is obtained by appointment, election, or purchase.
8. The manner of sitting on a horse: a rider with a good seat.
v. seat·ed, seat·ing, seats
v.tr.
1.
a. To place in or on a seat.
b. To cause or assist to sit down: The ushers will seat the members of the bride's family.
2. To provide with a particular seat: The usher seated me in the back row.
3. To have or provide seats for: We can seat 300 in the auditorium.
4. To install in a position of authority or eminence.
5. To fix firmly in place: seat an ammunition clip in an automatic rifle.
v.intr.
To rest on or fit into another part: The O-rings had not seated correctly in their grooves.
Idiom:
by the seat of (one's) pants Informal
1. In a manner based on intuition and experience rather than method: He ran the business by the seat of his pants.
2. Without the use of instruments: an inexperienced pilot who had to fly the aircraft by the seat of her pants.

[Middle English sete, probably from Old Norse s?ti; see sed- in Indo-European roots.]

seats

  • dress circle - So called because it is a circular row of seats at an entertainment, the spectators of which are expected to be in dress clothes.
  • sedile - A seat by the altar for a member of the church clergy.
  • tandem - From Latin, literally "eventually, at length," and then, metaphorically, "acting conjointly"; in the 1880s, it was transferred from a two-horse carriage to a bicycle with two seats, one behind the other.
  • circus - Latin for "ring," its first use was for the arena of Roman antiquity, an oval or circular area enclosed by tiers of seats and usually covered by a tent.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.seats - an area that includes places where several people can sitseats - an area that includes places where several people can sit; "there is seating for 40 students in this classroom"
dress circle, circle - a curved section or tier of seats in a hall or theater or opera house; usually the first tier above the orchestra; "they had excellent seats in the dress circle"
orchestra - seating on the main floor in a theater
parquet - seating on the main floor between the orchestra and the parquet circle
parquet circle, parterre - seating at the rear of the main floor (beneath the balconies)
ringside, ringside seat - first row of seating; has an unobstructed view of a boxing or wrestling ring
seat - furniture that is designed for sitting on; "there were not enough seats for all the guests"
stall - seating in the forward part of the main level of a theater
tiered seat - seating that is arranged in sloping tiers so that spectators in the back can see over the heads of those in front
elbow room, room, way - space for movement; "room to pass"; "make way for"; "hardly enough elbow room to turn around"
Translations
References in classic literature ?
Just beneath the lowest tier of seats was a series of barred cages on a level with the surface of the arena.
Not less than mine became her desire that I should have my way - but, ah, the iron seats in that park of horrible repute, and that bare room at the top of many flights of stairs
The backs of the seats were thrown back, bedsteads carefully packed were rolled out by an ingenious system, berths were suddenly improvised, and each traveller had soon at his disposition a comfortable bed, protected from curious eyes by thick curtains.