secesh

secesh

(sɪˈsɛʃ) or

secesher

n
a secessionist soldier or sympathizer in the American Civil War
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References in periodicals archive ?
A number of other styles with Davidson scopes were occasionally seen in Secesh ranks.
19) Whitman describes defeated soldiers returning from Bull Run as "true braves" (PP, 733); later, he titles a section about a heroic act by a Southern soldier "A Secesh Brave" (PP, 744).
A slight addition--the fuels reduction/firewise project that I managed on Secesh Meadow in 2005 and 2006 was supported by a grant from the Idaho Department of Lands and Idaho County.
Higginson as he accepted the New Year's greeting of one of his African-American soldiers: "Suh, last year I was the servant of a colonel of Secesh.
On the road to Bone's plantation, he protects them from the Secesh by pretending that he owns them.
The former slaves on one Phillips County plantation refused to work under the new orders, noting that, "We used to work so in Secesh times.
Journal of a Secesh Lady": The Diary of Catherine Ann Devereux Edmondston, 1860-1866 (1979), p.
In a scene that has become frighteningly familiar for residents across the West, a wall of fire roared through the crown of the forest into the Idaho mountain hamlet of Secesh Meadows.
30) Massachusetts soldiers were digging a grave for a fallen comrade in May 1862 "when one of those secesh ladies was passing along--she stopped and told them to dig it deeper.
He is not swayed, however, and when Camilla hesitates to say more, Miriam picks up an unfinished sentence and tells her grandson that "to join the secesh is to raise your hands agin your own race" (59).
That night McClellan advised his wife: "My only apprehension is that secesh will manage to get back across the Potomac at W[illia]msport before I can catch him.