secular


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Financial, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to secular: secular stagnation

sec·u·lar

 (sĕk′yə-lər)
adj.
1.
a. Worldly rather than spiritual: the secular affairs of the parish.
b. Not relating to religion or to a religious body; nonreligious: secular music.
c. Not bound by the full monastic rule of a religious order. Used of clergy.
2. Relating to or advocating secularism.
3.
a. Occurring or observed once in an age or century, as games in ancient Rome.
b. Lasting or persisting for a long time: a secular bear market.
c. Astronomy Of or relating to characteristics of astronomical phenomena that change slowly over time.
n.
1. A member of the secular clergy.
2. A layperson.

[Middle English, from Old French seculer, from Late Latin saeculāris, from Latin, of an age, from saeculum, generation, age.]

sec′u·lar·ly adv.

secular

(ˈsɛkjʊlə)
adj
1. of or relating to worldly as opposed to sacred things; temporal
2. not concerned with or related to religion
3. not within the control of the Church
4. (Education) (of an education, etc)
a. having no particular religious affinities
b. not including compulsory religious studies or services
5. (Ecclesiastical Terms) (of clerics) not bound by religious vows to a monastic or other order
6. occurring or appearing once in an age or century
7. lasting for a long time
8. (Astronomy) astronomy occurring slowly over a long period of time: the secular perturbation of a planet's orbit.
n
9. (Ecclesiastical Terms) a member of the secular clergy
10. another word for layman
[C13: from Old French seculer, from Late Latin saeculāris temporal, from Latin: concerning an age, from saeculum an age]
ˈsecularly adv

sec•u•lar

(ˈsɛk yə lər)

adj.
1. of or pertaining to worldly things or to things not regarded as sacred; temporal.
2. not relating to or concerned with religion (opposed to sacred): secular music.
3. concerned with nonreligious subjects: secular schools.
4. not belonging to a religious order; not bound by monastic vows (opposed to regular).
5. occurring or celebrated once in an age or century.
6. continuing throughout the ages.
n.
7. a layperson.
8. one of the secular clergy.
[1250–1300; Middle English seculer (< Old French) < Late Latin saeculāris worldly, temporal (opposed to eternal), Latin: of an age < Latin saecul(um) long period of time]
sec′u•lar•ly, adv.

secular

- Has a root meaning of "temporal"—opposed to the eternity of the church—and means "not connected to a religion."
See also related terms for religion.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.secular - someone who is not a clergyman or a professional person
laity, temporalty - in Christianity, members of a religious community that do not have the priestly responsibilities of ordained clergy
common man, common person, commoner - a person who holds no title
lay reader - a layman who is authorized by the bishop to read parts of the service in an Anglican or Episcopal church
Adj.1.secular - of or relating to the doctrine that rejects religion and religious considerations
2.secular - characteristic of or devoted to the temporal world as opposed to the spiritual world; "worldly goods and advancement"; "temporal possessions of the church"
earthly - of or belonging to or characteristic of this earth as distinguished from heaven; "earthly beings"; "believed that our earthly life is all that matters"; "earthly love"; "our earthly home"
profane, secular - not concerned with or devoted to religion; "sacred and profane music"; "secular drama"; "secular architecture", "children being brought up in an entirely profane environment"
sophisticated - having or appealing to those having worldly knowledge and refinement and savoir-faire; "sophisticated young socialites"; "a sophisticated audience"; "a sophisticated lifestyle"; "a sophisticated book"
3.secular - not concerned with or devoted to religion; "sacred and profane music"; "secular drama"; "secular architecture", "children being brought up in an entirely profane environment"
earthly - of or belonging to or characteristic of this earth as distinguished from heaven; "earthly beings"; "believed that our earthly life is all that matters"; "earthly love"; "our earthly home"
impious - lacking piety or reverence for a god
worldly, secular, temporal - characteristic of or devoted to the temporal world as opposed to the spiritual world; "worldly goods and advancement"; "temporal possessions of the church"
4.secular - of or relating to clergy not bound by monastic vows; "the secular clergy"
religious - of or relating to clergy bound by monastic vows; "the religious or regular clergy conducts the service"
5.secular - characteristic of those who are not members of the clergy; "set his collar in laic rather than clerical position"; "the lay ministry"
profane, secular - not concerned with or devoted to religion; "sacred and profane music"; "secular drama"; "secular architecture", "children being brought up in an entirely profane environment"

secular

secular

adjective
1. Relating to or characteristic of the earth or of human life on earth:
2. Not religious in subject matter, form, or use:
Translations
عِلْماني
světský
sekulærverdslig
aikaväliajallinenmaallinenpitkäsekulaarinen
veraldlegur
laicīgspasaulīgs
posveten
dinsel olmayanlâik

secular

[ˈsekjʊləʳ] ADJ [authority] → laico; [writings, music] → profano; [priest] → secular, seglar
secular schoolescuela f laica

secular

[ˈsɛkjʊr] adj [world, society, state, institute, government, press, group] → laïque

secular

adjweltlich, säkular; music, artprofan; court, educationweltlich; statesäkular; secular priestWeltgeistliche(r) mf

secular

[ˈsɛkjʊləʳ] adj (authority, school) → laico/a; (writings, music) → profano/a; (clergy) → secolare

secular

(ˈsekjulə) adjective
not spiritual or religious. secular art/music.
References in classic literature ?
Then shall they seek to avail themselves of names, Places and titles, and with these to joine Secular power, though feigning still to act By spiritual, to themselves appropriating The Spirit of God, promisd alike and giv'n To all Beleevers; and from that pretense, Spiritual Lawes by carnal power shall force On every conscience; Laws which none shall finde Left them inrould, or what the Spirit within Shall on the heart engrave.
Yet so loose were the ideas of the times respecting the conduct of the clergy, whether secular or regular, that the Prior Aymer maintained a fair character in the neighbourhood of his abbey.
Then all we have to do," said the curate, "is to hand them over to the secular arm of the housekeeper, and ask me not why, or we shall never have done.
The secular cooling that must someday overtake our planet has already gone far indeed with our neighbour.
Secular and religious education had effaced the throat-grappling in- stinct, or else firm finance held in check the pas- sions.
It was a very short man in the black uniform of the Roman secular clergy, and looking
Helene understood that the question was very simple and easy from the ecclesiastical point of view, and that her directors were making difficulties only because they were apprehensive as to how the matter would be regarded by the secular authorities.
They looked more secular and critical as then listened to the ravings of the old black man with a cloth round his loins cursing with vehement gesture by a camp-fire in the desert.
But it must be admitted that the fixing, which had to come first, was the more difficult task:--what secular avocation on earth was there for a young man (whose friends could not get him an "appointment") which was at once gentlemanly, lucrative, and to be followed without special knowledge?
Turning to the secular brothers and sisters of these peasant ecclesiastics, at first sight so strongly contrasted with them, M.
Miss Ladd broke through her rule of attending to secular affairs on week days only; and, after consulting with Mrs.
Every one must have remarked how mud-banks, left by the retiring tide, imitate in miniature a country with hill and dale; and here we have the original model in rock, formed as the continent rose during the secular retirement of the ocean, instead of during the ebbing and flowing of the tides.