seduce

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Related to seducers: flatterers

se·duce

 (sĭ-do͞os′, -dyo͞os′)
tr.v. se·duced, se·duc·ing, se·duc·es
1. To attract or lead (someone) away from proper behavior or thinking: "He had been in this way seduced from the wisdom of his cooler judgment" (Anthony Trollope). See Synonyms at lure.
2. To induce (someone) to engage in sexual activity, as by flirting or persuasion.
3. To entice into a different state or position: "Journalism may seduce [a writer-professor] from the campus" (Irwin Erdman).

[Middle English seduisen, from Old French seduire, seduis-, alteration (influenced by Medieval Latin sēdūcere, to lead astray) of suduire, to seduce, from Latin subdūcere, to withdraw : sub-, sub- + dūcere, to lead; see deuk- in Indo-European roots.]

se·duce′a·ble, se·duc′i·ble adj.
se·duc′er n.

seduce

(sɪˈdjuːs)
vb (tr)
1. to persuade to engage in sexual intercourse
2. to lead astray, as from the right action
3. to win over, attract, or lure
[C15: from Latin sēdūcere to lead apart, from sē- apart + dūcere to lead]
seˈducible, seˈduceable adj

se•duce

(sɪˈdus, -ˈdyus)

v.t. -duced, -duc•ing.
1. to lead astray, as from duty or principles; corrupt.
2. to induce to have sexual intercourse.
3. to win over; attract.
[1470–80; earlier seduise < Middle French seduis-, s. of seduire < Latin sēdūcere to lead aside =sē- se- + dūcere to lead]
se•duce′ment, n.
se•duc′er, n.
se•duc′i•ble, adj.
syn: See tempt.

seduce


Past participle: seduced
Gerund: seducing

Imperative
seduce
seduce
Present
I seduce
you seduce
he/she/it seduces
we seduce
you seduce
they seduce
Preterite
I seduced
you seduced
he/she/it seduced
we seduced
you seduced
they seduced
Present Continuous
I am seducing
you are seducing
he/she/it is seducing
we are seducing
you are seducing
they are seducing
Present Perfect
I have seduced
you have seduced
he/she/it has seduced
we have seduced
you have seduced
they have seduced
Past Continuous
I was seducing
you were seducing
he/she/it was seducing
we were seducing
you were seducing
they were seducing
Past Perfect
I had seduced
you had seduced
he/she/it had seduced
we had seduced
you had seduced
they had seduced
Future
I will seduce
you will seduce
he/she/it will seduce
we will seduce
you will seduce
they will seduce
Future Perfect
I will have seduced
you will have seduced
he/she/it will have seduced
we will have seduced
you will have seduced
they will have seduced
Future Continuous
I will be seducing
you will be seducing
he/she/it will be seducing
we will be seducing
you will be seducing
they will be seducing
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been seducing
you have been seducing
he/she/it has been seducing
we have been seducing
you have been seducing
they have been seducing
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been seducing
you will have been seducing
he/she/it will have been seducing
we will have been seducing
you will have been seducing
they will have been seducing
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been seducing
you had been seducing
he/she/it had been seducing
we had been seducing
you had been seducing
they had been seducing
Conditional
I would seduce
you would seduce
he/she/it would seduce
we would seduce
you would seduce
they would seduce
Past Conditional
I would have seduced
you would have seduced
he/she/it would have seduced
we would have seduced
you would have seduced
they would have seduced
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.seduce - induce to have sex; "Harry finally seduced Sally"; "Did you score last night?"; "Harry made Sally"
persuade - cause somebody to adopt a certain position, belief, or course of action; twist somebody's arm; "You can't persuade me to buy this ugly vase!"
seduce - lure or entice away from duty, principles, or proper conduct; "She was seduced by the temptation of easy money and started to work in a massage parlor"
2.seduce - lure or entice away from duty, principles, or proper conduct; "She was seduced by the temptation of easy money and started to work in a massage parlor"
entice, lure, tempt - provoke someone to do something through (often false or exaggerated) promises or persuasion; "He lured me into temptation"
seduce, score, make - induce to have sex; "Harry finally seduced Sally"; "Did you score last night?"; "Harry made Sally"

seduce

verb
1. tempt, attract, lure, entice, trap, mislead, deceive, beguile, allure, decoy, ensnare, hypnotize, lead astray, inveigle The view of the lake and plunging cliffs seduces visitors.
2. corrupt, take advantage of, have sex with, ruin (archaic), betray, violate, ravish, deprave, dishonour, debauch, deflower, have your wicked way with a fifteen-year-old seduced by a man twice her age

seduce

verb
1. To beguile or draw into a wrong or foolish course of action:
Idiom: lead astray.
2. To lure or persuade into a sexual relationship or a sexual act:
Translations
يَغْوي، يُغْري
svést
forførelokke
tæla
gundymas
kārdinātvilināt
seduce
zviesť
baştan çıkarmak

seduce

[sɪˈdjuːs] VT (sexually) → seducir
to seduce sb into doing sth (fig) → engatusar or convencer a algn para que haga algo
to seduce sb from his dutyapartar a algn de su deber

seduce

[sɪˈdjuːs] vt
(sexually)séduire
(= persuade) → séduire
to seduce sb into doing sth → persuader qn de faire qch
to seduce sb into sth → entraîner qn vers qch

seduce

vtverführen; to seduce somebody into doing somethingjdn zu etw verleiten, jdn dazu verleiten, etw zu tun; to seduce somebody (away) from his duty/a placejdn seine Pflichten vergessen lassen/von einem Ort weglocken; to seduce somebody (away) from his wifejdn seiner Frau abspenstig machen

seduce

[sɪˈdjuːs] vtsedurre

seduce

(siˈdjuːs) verb
to persuade or attract into doing, thinking etc (something, especially something foolish or wrong). She was seduced by the attractions of the big city.
seˈduction (-ˈdak-) noun
something that tempts or attracts. the seductions of life in the big city.
seductive (siˈdaktiv) adjective
tempting, attractive or charming. a seductive melody.
References in classic literature ?
Then you must further imagine the same thing to happen to the son which has already happened to the father:--he is drawn into a perfectly lawless life, which by his seducers is termed perfect liberty; and his father and friends take part with his moderate desires, and the opposite party assist the opposite ones.
It was the same with the gambling-house keeper and the poolroom man, and the same with any other man or woman who had a means of getting "graft," and was willing to pay over a share of it: the green-goods man and the highwayman, the pickpocket and the sneak thief, and the receiver of stolen goods, the seller of adulterated milk, of stale fruit and diseased meat, the proprietor of unsanitary tenements, the fake doctor and the usurer, the beggar and the "pushcart man," the prize fighter and the professional slugger, the race-track "tout," the procurer, the white-slave agent, and the expert seducer of young girls.
I could not trace her beyond her first seducer, and there was every reason to fear that she had removed from him only to sink deeper in a life of sin.
Suzanne took the bag and departed, after allowing the old bachelor to kiss her, which he did with an air that seemed to say, "It is a right which costs me dear; but it is better than being harried by a lawyer in the court of assizes as the seducer of a girl accused of infanticide.
Diomed all undaunted answered, "Archer, you who without your bow are nothing, slanderer and seducer, if you were to be tried in single combat fighting in full armour, your bow and your arrows would serve you in little stead.
The three o'clock sun shone full upon him, and the strange enervating conviction that her seducer confronted her, which had been gaining ground in Tess ever since she had heard his words distinctly, was at last established as a fact indeed.
Archer turned to the stage, where, in the familiar setting of giant roses and pen-wiper pansies, the same large blonde victim was succumbing to the same small brown seducer.
Such is the history--not as it is usually told, but as it is when stripped of the nauseous sentimentality that would enshrine for our loving worship a dastardly seducer like Pierre Abelard.
Mademoiselle Bourienne was often touched to tears as in imagination she told this story to him, her seducer.
This consideration gave him no little uneasiness, till Betty, the elder sister, was so kind, some time afterwards, entirely to cure him by a hint, that one Will Barnes, and not himself, had been the first seducer of Molly; and that the little child, which he had hitherto so certainly concluded to be his own, might very probably have an equal title, at least, to claim Barnes for its father.
I am now obliged to ask for the name of her seducer.
She knew how the unhappy Lord Dovedale, whose mamma had taken a house at Oxford, so that he might be educated there, and who had never touched a card in his life till he came to London, was perverted by Rawdon at the Cocoa-Tree, made helplessly tipsy by this abominable seducer and perverter of youth, and fleeced of four thousand pounds.