References in classic literature ?
In the little paths among the seed beds she stood holding a paper bag in her hand.
Fuchs told me that the sunflowers were introduced into that country by the Mormons; that at the time of the persecution, when they left Missouri and struck out into the wilderness to find a place where they could worship God in their own way, the members of the first exploring party, crossing the plains to Utah, scattered sunflower seed as they went.
There is much fruitful soil uncultivated here," he said; "and, I may add, without the sinful leaven of self- commendation, that, since my short sojourn in these heathenish abodes, much good seed has been scattered by the wayside.
Hence, too, might be drawn a weighty lesson from the little-regarded truth, that the act of the passing generation is the germ which may and must produce good or evil fruit in a far-distant time; that, together with the seed of the merely temporary crop, which mortals term expediency, they inevitably sow the acorns of a more enduring growth, which may darkly overshadow their posterity.
I seed her reported in the offing this morning; a three years' voyage, and a full ship.
Lor, I seed you," said Andy; "an't you an old hoss, Sam?
In the gun were two sizes -- wee mustard- seed shot, and another sort that were several times larger.
I's seed 'm befo'; I don't k'yer to see 'em no mo'.
In five minutes they returned, the little ones bearing plates of thin caraway wafers,--hearts, diamonds, and circles daintily sugared, and flecked with caraway seed raised in the garden behind the house.
I seed young Linton boath coming and going, and I seed YAH' (directing his discourse to me), 'yah gooid fur nowt, slattenly witch
Sow the same seed of rapacious license and oppression over again, and it will surely yield the same fruit according to its kind.
I had seen the harvest, but had never thought of the seed.