seed coat

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seed coat

n.
The outer protective covering of a seed.

seed coat

n
(Botany) the nontechnical name for testa

seed′ coat`


n.
the outer covering of a seed.
[1790–1800]

seed coat

The outer protective covering of a seed. Also called testa.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.seed coat - protective outer layer of seeds of flowering plantsseed coat - protective outer layer of seeds of flowering plants
reproductive structure - the parts of a plant involved in its reproduction
seed - a mature fertilized plant ovule consisting of an embryo and its food source and having a protective coat or testa
References in periodicals archive ?
Furthermore, chilling temperatures (about 15 [degrees]C) during flowering induce browning and cracking of seed coats (Sunada and Ito, 1982).
Seeds with hard seed coats are generally long-lived (Bass, 1980; Priestley, 1986)--hard seeds such as Canna, Lotus, and Lupinus have survived for over 500 years (Bass, 1980).
Which four-letter word beginning with B is the edible seed coats of cereal grain removed during the process of milling and used as a source of dietary fibre?
Soaking the seeds or chipping the hard seed coats with a sharp knife will speed up the germination process.
After the initial phase of seed formation, young seed coats remain attached to the embryo providing this necessary substances to its full development, from the previous storage in the integument and subsequent transfer to the embryo when it starts to accumulate reserves (BORISJUK et al.
Seed coats can cause seed dormancy by acting as a mechanical barrier for embryo protruding, the presence of chemical inhibitors, interference with water uptake and /or oxygen exchange and can also obstacle the embryo from light (Baskin, & Baskin, 1998; Morris, Tieu, & Dixon, 2000).
Sulfuric acid acts on the seed coats removing the outer layers, such as cuticle and the cuticle layers, throughout the coat, allowing more homogeneous permeability degrees (SANTAREM; AQUILA, 1995).
So in his next study, Gesch worked with ARS soil scientist and research leader Brenton Sharratt to evaluate the effects of seed coats in conventional-till and no-till fields.
In addition, the seed margin, a specialised part of the seed coat in mature seeds, exhibited the same structural differences as seed coats in hulled vs.
Seeds with deliberately damaged seed coats have a much lower survival probability both in the soil (Davis et al.
Contrasting accumulations of calcium and magnesium in seed coats and embryos of common bean and soybean.
Thus, in this study, we investigated the anti-diabetic and anti-oxidative effects of anthocyanins (ANT) from black soybean seed coats in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats.