seedy

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seed·y

 (sē′dē)
adj. seed·i·er, seed·i·est
1. Having many seeds.
2. Resembling seeds or a seed.
3. Worn and shabby; unkempt: "He was soiled and seedy and fragrant with gin" (Mark Twain).
4. Somewhat disreputable; squalid: a seedy hotel in a run-down neighborhood.
5. Chiefly British Tired or sick; unwell.

seed′i·ly adv.
seed′i·ness n.

seedy

(ˈsiːdɪ)
adj, seedier or seediest
1. shabby or unseemly in appearance: seedy clothes.
2. (Botany) (of a plant) at the stage of producing seeds
3. informal not physically fit; sickly
ˈseedily adv
ˈseediness n

seed•y

(ˈsi di)

adj. seed•i•er, seed•i•est.
1. containing many seeds.
2. bearing seeds.
3. poorly kept; run-down.
4. shabbily dressed; unkempt.
5. slightly ill.
[1565–75]
seed′i•ly, adv.
seed′i•ness, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.seedy - full of seeds; "as seedy as a fig"
seedless - lacking seeds; "seedless grapefruit"
2.seedy - shabby and untidy; "a surge of ragged scruffy children"; "he was soiled and seedy and fragrant with gin"- Mark Twain
worn - affected by wear; damaged by long use; "worn threads on the screw"; "a worn suit"; "the worn pockets on the jacket"
3.seedy - somewhat ill or prone to illnessseedy - somewhat ill or prone to illness; "my poor ailing grandmother"; "feeling a bit indisposed today"; "you look a little peaked"; "feeling poorly"; "a sickly child"; "is unwell and can't come to work"
ill, sick - affected by an impairment of normal physical or mental function; "ill from the monotony of his suffering"
4.seedy - morally degraded; "a seedy district"; "the seamy side of life"; "sleazy characters hanging around casinos"; "sleazy storefronts with...dirt on the walls"- Seattle Weekly; "the sordid details of his orgies stank under his very nostrils"- James Joyce; "the squalid atmosphere of intrigue and betrayal"
disreputable - lacking respectability in character or behavior or appearance

seedy

adjective
1. sleazy, sordid, squalid, low, nasty They suck you into their seedy world.
2. shabby, run-down, scruffy, old, worn, faded, decaying, grubby, dilapidated, tatty, unkempt, grotty (slang), crummy (slang), down at heel, slovenly, mangy, manky (Scot. dialect), scungy (Austral. & N.Z.) a seedy hotel close to the red light district
shabby smart, elegant, fashionable, posh (informal, chiefly Brit.), classy, swish (informal, chiefly Brit.), up-market, swanky (informal), top-drawer, ritzy (slang), high-toned
3. (Informal) unwell, ill, poorly (informal), crook (Austral. & N.Z. informal), ailing, sickly, out of sorts, off colour, under the weather (informal), peely-wally (Scot.) All right, are you? Not feeling seedy?

seedy

adjective
Showing signs of wear and tear or neglect:
Informal: tacky.
Slang: ratty.
Idioms: all the worse for wear, gone to pot, past cure.
Translations
رَث، بالٍغَيْر صِحّي، مُتَوَعِّك
nemocnýzchátralý
lurvetuvel
huonomaineinenhuonovointinenlikainen
kopottas külsejû
lasinn, slappursubbulegur
döküntükeyifsizkılıksızköhnepis

seedy

[ˈsiːdɪ] ADJ (seedier (compar) (seediest (superl)))
1. (= shabby) [hotel, nightclub] → sórdido, de mala muerte, cutre (Sp) ; [clothes] → raído, cutre (Sp) ; [person] → de pinta desastrada
a seedy-looking barun bar sórdido, un bar de mala muerte, un bar cutre (Sp)
2. (= unwell) I'm feeling seedytengo un poco de mal cuerpo
he looks a bit seedytiene mala cara

seedy

[ˈsiːdi] adj (= shabby) [person, hotel, street, area, club, bar] → miteux/euse

seedy

adj (+er)
(= disreputable) person, characterzweifelhaft, zwielichtig; area, placezwielichtig
(inf: = unwell) I feel seedymir ist flau (inf), → mir ist nicht gut; to look seedyangeschlagen aussehen (inf), → nicht gut aussehen

seedy

[ˈsiːdɪ] adj (-ier (comp) (-iest (superl))) (fam) (sordid, shabby) → squallido/a
I feel decidedly seedy today → non mi sento affatto bene oggi

seed

(siːd) noun
1. the (part of) the fruit of a tree, plant etc from which a new plant may be grown. sunflower seeds; grass seed.
2. the beginning from which anything grows. There was already a seed of doubt in her mind.
3. (in a sporting competition etc) a seeded player.
verb
1. (of a plant) to produce seed. A plant seeds after it has flowered.
2. in golf, tennis etc, to arrange (good players) in a competition so that they do not compete against each other till the later rounds.
ˈseeded adjective
having been seeded. a seeded player.
ˈseedling (-liŋ) noun
a young plant just grown from a seed. Don't walk on the lettuce seedlings!
ˈseedy adjective
1. shabby. a rather seedy hotel.
2. ill or unhealthy. He's feeling a bit seedy.
ˈseediness noun
ˈseedbed noun
ground prepared for growing seeds.
go to seed
1. (of a person) to become careless about one's clothes and appearance. Don't let yourself go to seed when you reach middle age!
2. (of a place) to become rather shabby and uncared for. This part of town has gone to seed recently.
3. (also run to seed) (of a plant) to produce seeds after flowering.
References in periodicals archive ?
Trevor McDonald and former heavyweight champ Mike Tyson discuss the seedier side of Vegas
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At the same time, it has been careful to distance itself from the seedier elements of the Jade Helm furor, branding itself as an effort to help the military's efforts, not thwart them.
I'm not saying there "I'm not saying there isn't another seedier side isn't another seedier side t't he industry because t't he industry because there is.
They seemed to have embraced the seedier side of the business world as they travel where business leaders are very sharp at getting the message of "the good thing" on offer.
As Vincent gradually immerses himself in the seedier aspects of the game, Eddie begins to discover something of himself in his protege - and he does not like what he sees.
s all Just when you thought this debacle couldn't get any seedier.
In his latest case, Hole is once again drawn into Oslo's seedier side, the Norwegian capital under attack from a serial killer who likes killing policemen at the scenes of previous unsolved murders.
If William spent his nights in the seedier spots on the South Bank, he kept his comedies well away from them.
In a candid interview with Malcolm Conn, one of the journalists, whom Warner insulted on Twitter along with another journalist Robert Craddock for an article by Craddock on the seedier side of the IPL, the cricketer appeared to move on and settled for a handshake and a chat to resolve their differences, News.
Many celebrities, Hugh Grant to name one, court publicity when it suits them but do not like it when their seedier side is shown.
In this book, he invites locals and tourists alike to step into Portland, Oregon's seedier side of the 1860s to the early 1900s.