seeming

(redirected from seemings)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Legal.

seem·ing

 (sē′mĭng)
adj.
Apparent; ostensible.
n.
Outward appearance; semblance.

seem′ing·ly adv.
seem′ing·ness n.

seeming

(ˈsiːmɪŋ)
adj
(prenominal) apparent but not actual or genuine: seeming honesty.
n
outward or false appearance
ˈseemingness n

seem•ing

(ˈsi mɪŋ)

adj.
1. apparent; ostensible: a seeming advantage.
n.
2. outward appearance.
[1300–50]
seem′ing•ly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.seeming - appearing as such but not necessarily so; "for all his apparent wealth he had no money to pay the rent"; "the committee investigated some apparent discrepancies"; "the ostensible truth of their theories"; "his seeming honesty"
superficial - concerned with or comprehending only what is apparent or obvious; not deep or penetrating emotionally or intellectually; "superficial similarities"; "a superficial mind"; "his thinking was superficial and fuzzy"; "superficial knowledge"; "the superficial report didn't give the true picture"; "only superficial differences"

seeming

adjective apparent, appearing, outward, surface, illusory, ostensible, specious, quasi- We'll have peace of mind amidst seeming chaos.

seeming

adjective
Appearing as such but not necessarily so:
Translations
ظاهِري
zdánlivý
tilsyneladende
sem virîist vera
görünüşteki

seeming

[ˈsiːmɪŋ]
A. ADJaparente
B. Napariencia f

seeming

[ˈsiːmɪŋ] adj (= apparent) [contradiction, inability, indifference] → apparent(e)

seeming

adj attrscheinbar

seeming

[ˈsiːmɪŋ] adjapparente

seem

(siːm) verb
to have the appearance or give the impression of being or doing. A thin person always seems (to be) taller than he really is; She seems kind; He seemed to hesitate for a minute.
ˈseeming adjective
existing in appearance, though not usually in reality. her seeming indifference.
ˈseemingly adverb
apparently; according to report. Seemingly, her mother is very ill.
ˈseemly adjective
(negative unseemly) (of behaviour etc) suitable, proper or decent. seemly conduct.
References in classic literature ?
And let him continue thus to the hour of death; being just and seeming to be unjust.
My surprize is the greater because on Wednesday, the very day of his coming to Parklands, we had a most unexpected and unwelcome visit from Lady Susan, looking all cheerfulness and good-humour, and seeming more as if she were to marry him when she got to London than as if parted from him for ever.
Seeming wise men may make shift to get opinion; but let no man choose them for employment; for certainly you were better take for business, a man somewhat absurd, than over-formal.
So although Defoe was now free to all seeming, this was really the beginning of bondage.
Half savage as the man showed, with no covering on his matted head, with his brown arms bare to between the elbow and the shoulder, with the loose knot of a looser kerchief lying low on his bare breast in a wilderness of beard and whisker, with such dress as he wore seeming to be made out of the mud that begrimed his boat, still there was a business-like usage in his steady gaze.
To account for this seeming forgetfullness I must inform you of a trifling circumstance concerning them which I have as yet never mentioned.
1-16) I will tell of Dionysus, the son of glorious Semele, how he appeared on a jutting headland by the shore of the fruitless sea, seeming like a stripling in the first flush of manhood: his rich, dark hair was waving about him, and on his strong shoulders he wore a purple robe.
Shtcherbatsky and Tchirikov, supporting the crowns and stumbling over the bride's train, smiling too and seeming delighted at something, were at one moment left behind, at the next treading on the bridal pair as the priest came to a halt.
He stroked my right hand, seeming to admire the softness and colour; but he squeezed it so hard between his hoof and his pastern, that I was forced to roar; after which they both touched me with all possible tenderness.
Caswall was much surprised to see Adam come to his house, but lent himself to the task of seeming to be pleased.
She threw changing glances at men who passed her, giving smiling invitations to men of rural or untaught pattern and usually seeming sedately unconscious of the men with a metropolitan seal upon their faces.
But like Czar Peter content to toil in the shipyards of foreign cities, Queequeg disdained no seeming ignominy, if thereby he might happily gain the power of enlightening his untutored countrymen.