seen


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seen

 (sēn)
v.
Past participle of see1.

seen

(siːn)
vb
the past participle of see1

see1

(si)

v. saw, seen, see•ing. v.t.
1. to perceive with the eyes; look at.
2. to view; visit or attend as a spectator.
3. to perceive (things) mentally; understand.
4. to construct a mental image of; visualize.
5. to accept or imagine as acceptable: I can't see him as president.
6. to be cognizant of; recognize: to see one's mistake.
7. to scan or view, esp. by electronic means.
8. to foresee: He doesn't see us in a war.
9. to ascertain; find out: See who is at the door.
10. to have knowledge or experience of: to see service in the Peace Corps.
11. to make sure: See that the door is locked.
12. to meet and converse with.
13. to receive as a visitor.
14. to visit.
15. to court or date frequently.
16. to help or assist: He's seeing his brother through college.
17. to escort or accompany: to see someone home.
18. to match (a bet) or match the bet of (a bettor) by staking an equal sum; call: I'll see your five and raise you five.
19. to read or read about.
v.i.
20. to have the power of sight.
21. to understand intellectually or spiritually; have insight.
22. to pay attention; heed: See, here it comes.
23. to find out; ascertain: See for yourself.
24. to think; consider: Let me see, what was his name?
25. see about,
a. to inquire about; investigate.
b. Also, see after. to attend to; take care of.
26. see off, to accompany (someone about to go on a journey) to the place of departure.
27. see out,
a. to work on until completion; finish; see through.
b. to escort to an outer door.
28. see through,
a. to ascertain the true nature of, esp. to detect the sham or treachery in.
b. to remain with until completion; see out.
29. see to, to take care of; attend to; see about: to see to the travel arrangements.
Idioms:
see red, Informal. to become enraged.
[before 900; Old English sēon, c. Old Frisian siā, Old Saxon, Old High German sehan, Old Norse sjā, Gothic saihwan]
see′a•ble, adj.
syn: See watch.

see2

(si)

n.
the seat, center of authority, office, or jurisdiction of a bishop.
[1250–1300; Middle English se(e) < Old French se (variant of sie) < Latin sēdes seat]
Translations

see1

(siː) past tense saw (soː) : past participle seen verb
1. to have the power of sight. After six years of blindness, he found he could see.
2. to be aware of by means of the eye. I can see her in the garden.
3. to look at. Did you see that play on television?
4. to have a picture in the mind. I see many difficulties ahead.
5. to understand. She didn't see the point of the joke.
6. to investigate. Leave this here and I'll see what I can do for you.
7. to meet. I'll see you at the usual time.
8. to accompany. I'll see you home.
see about
to attend to, or deal with. I'll see about this tomorrow.
seeing that
since; considering that. Seeing that he's ill, he's unlikely to come.
see off
to accompany (a person starting on a journey) to the airport, railway station etc from which he is to leave. He saw me off at the station.
see out
to last longer than. These old trees will see us all out.
see through
1. to give support to (a person, plan etc) until the end is reached. I'd like to see the job through.
2. not to be deceived by (a person, trick etc). We soon saw through him and his little plan.
see to
to attend to or deal with. I must see to the baby.
I/we etc will see
I, we etc shall wait and consider the matter later. `May I have a new bicycle?' `We'll see.

seen

a. pp. de to see, visto-a.

seen

pp de see
References in classic literature ?
Often, before I learned, did I wonder whence came the multitudes of pictures that thronged my dreams; for they were pictures the like of which I had never seen in real wake-a-day life.
We have seen him, more successful under the name of Jacob than under that of Isaac, gain the friendship of Gryphus, which for several months he cultivated by means of the best Genievre ever distilled from the Texel to Antwerp, and he lulled the suspicion of the jealous turnkey by holding out to him the flattering prospect of his designing to marry Rosa.
On his face was a look such as Kitty have never seen before.
Then the smoke of their fire-ships was seen at the mouth of our rivers, and their great men came in boats full of soldiers to talk to us of protection and peace.
I have seen him tantalize them thus until they fairly screamed in rage.
Are you all this time trying to find your way home from Troy, and have you never yet got back to Ithaca nor seen your wife in your own house?
I suspected,' said the King, 'that Ring was not quite useless; never have I seen such a day's work.
You have been thinking and thinking of this woman till you persuade yourself that you have actually seen her.
Seeing nothing save what I had seen already, I turned back into the house, and stood just within the shelter of the doorway, looking out into the night.
It was seen early in the morning, rushing over Winchester eastward, a line of flame high in the atmosphere.
The pearly lustre of the moon went out: The mossy banks and the meandering paths, The happy flowers and the repining trees, Were seen no more: the very roses' odors Died in the arms of the adoring airs.
The valet had seen the movement made by his master at the moment he received the order.