seep


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Related to seep: seep through, SEPE

seep

 (sēp)
intr.v. seeped, seep·ing, seeps
1. To pass slowly through small openings or pores; ooze: Water is seeping into the basement.
2. To enter, depart, or become diffused gradually: The importance of the situation finally seeped into my brain. The news seeped out bit by bit.
n.
A place on land or underwater where a liquid or gas oozes out of the ground.

[Alteration of dialectal sipe.]

seep

(siːp)
vb
(intr) to pass gradually or leak through or as if through small openings; ooze
n
1. a small spring or place where water, oil, etc, has oozed through the ground
2. another word for seepage
[Old English sīpian; related to Middle High German sīfen, Swedish dialect sipa]

seep

(sip)

v.i.
1. to pass, flow, or ooze gradually, as through a porous substance.
2. to become diffused; permeate.
v.t.
3. to cause to seep; filter.
n.
4. moisture that seeps out; seepage.
5. a small spring, pool, or the like, where liquid from the ground has oozed to the surface.
[1780–90; perhaps variant of dial. sipe, itself perhaps continuing Old English sīpian (c. Middle Low German sīpen)]
seep′y, adj.

seep


Past participle: seeped
Gerund: seeping

Imperative
seep
seep
Present
I seep
you seep
he/she/it seeps
we seep
you seep
they seep
Preterite
I seeped
you seeped
he/she/it seeped
we seeped
you seeped
they seeped
Present Continuous
I am seeping
you are seeping
he/she/it is seeping
we are seeping
you are seeping
they are seeping
Present Perfect
I have seeped
you have seeped
he/she/it has seeped
we have seeped
you have seeped
they have seeped
Past Continuous
I was seeping
you were seeping
he/she/it was seeping
we were seeping
you were seeping
they were seeping
Past Perfect
I had seeped
you had seeped
he/she/it had seeped
we had seeped
you had seeped
they had seeped
Future
I will seep
you will seep
he/she/it will seep
we will seep
you will seep
they will seep
Future Perfect
I will have seeped
you will have seeped
he/she/it will have seeped
we will have seeped
you will have seeped
they will have seeped
Future Continuous
I will be seeping
you will be seeping
he/she/it will be seeping
we will be seeping
you will be seeping
they will be seeping
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been seeping
you have been seeping
he/she/it has been seeping
we have been seeping
you have been seeping
they have been seeping
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been seeping
you will have been seeping
he/she/it will have been seeping
we will have been seeping
you will have been seeping
they will have been seeping
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been seeping
you had been seeping
he/she/it had been seeping
we had been seeping
you had been seeping
they had been seeping
Conditional
I would seep
you would seep
he/she/it would seep
we would seep
you would seep
they would seep
Past Conditional
I would have seeped
you would have seeped
he/she/it would have seeped
we would have seeped
you would have seeped
they would have seeped
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.seep - pass gradually or leak through or as if through small openings
course, flow, run, feed - move along, of liquids; "Water flowed into the cave"; "the Missouri feeds into the Mississippi"

seep

verb ooze, well, leak, soak, bleed, weep, trickle, leach, exude, permeate, percolate Radioactive water had seeped into underground reservoirs.

seep

verb
To flow or leak out or emit something slowly:
Translations
يَنِزُّ، يَرْشَح، يَسيلُ بِبُطء
mizetprosakovat
sive
seytla, vætla
izsūktiesmazinātiesnoplūstsūkties
pronicati
sızmak

seep

[siːp] VIfiltrarse
to seep through/into/fromfiltrarse or colarse por/en/de
seep away VI + ADVescurrirse
seep in VI + ADVfiltrarse
seep out VI + ADVescurrirse

seep

[ˈsiːp] vis'infiltrer
The petrol fumes seeped into the cab → Les vapeurs d'essences s'infiltraient dans la cabine.

seep

visickern; to seep through somethingdurch etw durchsickern; to seep into somethingin etw (acc)hineinsickern

seep

[siːp] vi to seep (through/from/into)filtrare (attraverso/da/in or dentro)
seep away vi + advscolare a poco a poco
seep in vi + advinfiltrarsi
seep out vi + advtrapelare

seep

(siːp) verb
(of liquids) to flow slowly eg through a very small opening. Blood seeped out through the bandage round his head; All his confidence seeped away.
References in periodicals archive ?
Not only do the innards of the city seep, but the city itself seeps.
That's the recent finding of Penn State University researchers who study tubeworms nourished by hydrocarbons that leak from the Earth's crust at cold-water openings called seeps.
This finding, as well as the identification of seep and vent vesicomyids on whale falls, is consistent with the hypothesis that whale carcasses may serve as stepping-stones for seep and vent organisms (1).
The study was conducted near Norways Svalbard Islands, above several seafloor methane seeps.
He said: "The area where these species were found is not currently fished and the confirmation of a cold seep is likely to result in the region being closed to bottom-contact fishing.
The company maintains that production activities are unrelated to the oil seeps.
We sampled 16 locations with various water depths over a 35-square-mile (90-square-kilometer) grid, with an additional comparison sample obtained from within the seep field itself.
With this critical information, the SUIT could prioritize the seep areas that would be capped for safety, along with those that would be capped for future gas production activity.
Carney (1994) took the first comprehensive attempt to classify organisms within the Gulf of Mexico (GOM) hydrocarbon seep communities as either vagrant (species present in the background but not present within the seeps in high density), colonist (species present in the background but in high density at the seep, indicating an established in-seep population), or resident (seep species not present in the background).
But just like naturally made fog, this "fake fog" can't transform into ghostly figures or seep under windows.
At some sites, the water flows from onshore aquifers to the sea through porous rocks and then seeps up through the seafloor.
According to Torning, "Cracks between such liner segments, however small, may trap colored plastic residue that could contaminate different color resins to be processed next, or may allow corrosive resins to seep through to attack the backing tube, shortening its service life.