segregate


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seg·re·gate

 (sĕg′rĭ-gāt′)
v. seg·re·gat·ed, seg·re·gat·ing, seg·re·gates
v.tr.
1. To separate or isolate from others or from a main body or group. See Synonyms at isolate.
2. To cause (people or institutions, for example) to be separated on the basis of race, sex, religion, or another factor.
v.intr.
1. To become separated or distinguished: animals that segregate into male and female herds when not in mating season.
2. To practice a policy of racial segregation.
3. Genetics To undergo genetic segregation.
adj. (-gĭt, -gāt′)
Separated; isolated.
n. (-gĭt, -gāt′)
1. One that is or has been segregated.
2. Genetics See segregant.

[Latin sēgregāre, sēgregāt- : sē-, apart; see s(w)e- in Indo-European roots + grex, greg-, flock; see ger- in Indo-European roots.]

seg′re·ga′tive adj.
seg′re·ga′tor n.

segregate

(ˈsɛɡrɪˌɡeɪt)
vb
1. to set or be set apart from others or from the main group
2. (Sociology) (tr) to impose segregation on (a racial or minority group)
3. (Metallurgy) genetics metallurgy to undergo or cause to undergo segregation
[C16: from Latin sēgregāre, from sē- apart + grex a flock]
segregable adj
ˈsegreˌgative adj
ˈsegreˌgator n

seg•re•gate

(v. ˈsɛg rɪˌgeɪt; n. -gɪt, -ˌgeɪt)

v. -gat•ed, -gat•ing,
n. v.t.
1. to separate or set apart from others; isolate.
2. to require, often with force, the separation of (a specific racial, religious, or other group) from the body of society.
v.i.
3. to become segregated.
4. to practice or require segregation, esp. racial segregation.
5. (of allelic genes) to separate during meiosis.
n.
6. a segregated thing, person, or group.
[1535–45; < Latin sēgregātus, past participle of sēgregāre to separate, dissociate =sē- se- + -gregāre, v. derivative of grex, s. greg flock; see -ate1]
seg′re•ga•ble (-gə bəl) adj.
seg′re•ga`tive, adj.

segregate


Past participle: segregated
Gerund: segregating

Imperative
segregate
segregate
Present
I segregate
you segregate
he/she/it segregates
we segregate
you segregate
they segregate
Preterite
I segregated
you segregated
he/she/it segregated
we segregated
you segregated
they segregated
Present Continuous
I am segregating
you are segregating
he/she/it is segregating
we are segregating
you are segregating
they are segregating
Present Perfect
I have segregated
you have segregated
he/she/it has segregated
we have segregated
you have segregated
they have segregated
Past Continuous
I was segregating
you were segregating
he/she/it was segregating
we were segregating
you were segregating
they were segregating
Past Perfect
I had segregated
you had segregated
he/she/it had segregated
we had segregated
you had segregated
they had segregated
Future
I will segregate
you will segregate
he/she/it will segregate
we will segregate
you will segregate
they will segregate
Future Perfect
I will have segregated
you will have segregated
he/she/it will have segregated
we will have segregated
you will have segregated
they will have segregated
Future Continuous
I will be segregating
you will be segregating
he/she/it will be segregating
we will be segregating
you will be segregating
they will be segregating
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been segregating
you have been segregating
he/she/it has been segregating
we have been segregating
you have been segregating
they have been segregating
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been segregating
you will have been segregating
he/she/it will have been segregating
we will have been segregating
you will have been segregating
they will have been segregating
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been segregating
you had been segregating
he/she/it had been segregating
we had been segregating
you had been segregating
they had been segregating
Conditional
I would segregate
you would segregate
he/she/it would segregate
we would segregate
you would segregate
they would segregate
Past Conditional
I would have segregated
you would have segregated
he/she/it would have segregated
we would have segregated
you would have segregated
they would have segregated
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.segregate - someone who is or has been segregated
individual, mortal, person, somebody, someone, soul - a human being; "there was too much for one person to do"
Verb1.segregate - separate by race or religion; practice a policy of racial segregation; "This neighborhood is segregated"; "We don't segregate in this county"
discriminate, single out, separate - treat differently on the basis of sex or race
desegregate, integrate, mix - open (a place) to members of all races and ethnic groups; "This school is completely desegregated"
2.segregate - divide from the main body or mass and collect; "Many towns segregated into new counties"; "Experiments show clearly that genes segregate"
divide, part, separate - come apart; "The two pieces that we had glued separated"
3.segregate - separate or isolate (one thing) from another and place in a group apart from others; "the sun segregates the carbon"; "large mining claims are segregated into smaller claims"
isolate, insulate - place or set apart; "They isolated the political prisoners from the other inmates"

segregate

segregate

verb
To set apart from a group:
Translations
يَعْزِل، يَفْصِل
oddělit
adskille
aîskilja
segregacija
atdalītnošķirt

segregate

[ˈsegrɪgeɪt] VTsegregar, separar (from de) to be segregated fromestar separado de

segregate

[ˈsɛgrɪgeɪt] vtségréguer

segregate

vt individualsabsondern; group of populationnach Rassen/Geschlechtern/Konfessionen trennen; activities, facilitiesnach gewissen Gesichtspunkten unterteilen; to be segregated from somebody/somethingvon jdm/etw abgesondert sein; segregated (racially, church) → nur für Weiße/Schwarze; school alsomit Rassentrennung; societynach Rassen getrennt

segregate

[ˈsɛgrɪˌgeɪt] vt to segregate (from)separare (da), segregare (da)

segregate

(ˈsegrigeit) verb
to separate from others; to keep (people, groups etc) apart from each other. At the swimming-pool, the sexes are segregated.
ˌsegreˈgation (-ʃən) noun
References in classic literature ?
It was with just such blades as these that these splendid heroes of romance used to segregate a man, so to speak, and leave the half of him to fall one way and the other half the other.
We could not segregate the sick, nor could we care for them.
But Jones, as well as Partridge, was an entire stranger in London; and as he happened to arrive first in a quarter of the town, the inhabitants of which have very little intercourse with the householders of Hanover or Grosvenor-square (for he entered through Gray's-inn-lane), so he rambled about some time before he could even find his way to those happy mansions where fortune segregates from the vulgar those magnanimous heroes, the descendants of antient Britons, Saxons, or Danes, whose ancestors, being born in better days, by sundry kinds of merit, have entailed riches and honour on their posterity.
Surely any alphabet ordered on a rational basis would, at the very least, segregate vowels from consonants.
The initiative called aACAyMy City My Environment' was launched in 2012 by the waste management department of the civic body, which has continued with its second phase this year, which aims to segregate all kinds of waste in Dubai by providing recycle bins free of cost to households across all areas in the emirate.
The Quirk: The insurer is domiciled in Wisconsin, the only state that allows regulators to segregate delinquent accounts while letting the parent continue operations unaffected.
Dubai Dubai Municipality has begun carrying out an ambitious plan to segregate household waste at source.
On Wednesday, the municipality said it has once again issued a circular stipulating that it is mandatory for all shopping malls to properly and effectively segregate the recyclable wastes such as plastic, paper, can, glass, metal and wood from the wastes designated for disposal.
Segregation at universities has long been urged by many clerics, but nothing happened until February, when Science Minister Daneshju announced the decision had been made to fully segregate the sexes on campus.
JP Morgan failed to segregate billions of pounds of cash from their own funds over nearly seven years.