segregationism


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segregationism

the views and policies of those who would separate or maintain as separate rights, public facilities, etc., on the basis of race. See also apartheid.
See also: Race
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.segregationism - a political orientation favoring political or racial segregation
ideology, political orientation, political theory - an orientation that characterizes the thinking of a group or nation
Translations
References in periodicals archive ?
He describes how the ways human rights ideas were adopted and reshaped during the period of burgher republicanism and colonialism in the eighteenth century, the humanitarianism and liberalism of the nineteenth century, segregationism of the early twentieth century, the Second World War and its aftermath, and the anti-apartheid era, as well as international condemnation of apartheid, the embrace of human rights in the late twentieth century, and the new constitution, the Truth and Reconciliation Commission.
Still, I would find it difficult to wrap my head around a discussion of normative racism or to distinguish American segregationism with the name of pluralism.
In point of fact, it would be more correct to say that the accusation of "Jewish racism" has deep roots in the history of antisemitism--going back to the charges of pagan Antiquity against Jewish misanthropia, isolationism, segregationism, originating in Hebrew monotheism.
By then, segregationism and protectionism had become reframed within an autonomy and rights model.
The extreme opposites in the theory of fiction are sometimes characterized as forms of segregationism and integrationism.
But his grim picture of an emerging global segregationism clearly contained troubling local significance.
A typical, if florid, example of the rhetoric that accompanied this new breed of extreme segregationism can be found in William Benjamin Smith's The Color Line: A Brief in Behalf of the Unborn:
Q Also on the same subject, how can a man who's supposed to be representing the people -- black, white, Jew, gentile, protestant, Catholic -- talk of segregationism from 1948, when he is -- in loving the old South, plantations, slaves, things of that nature, and talking of that and supposed to be for the people?
Particularly from 1948 on, they responded to the new stance of the national Democratic Party in favor of civil rights by adopting a strategy of elevating the rhetoric of anticommunism as a more widely acceptable cover for segregationism.
Their calls for racial justice and the possible acceptance of black Christians into white churches were weakened by a concern to hold together a denomination largely dominated by cultural conservatism, theological fundamentalism, and unreconstructed segregationism.
Mills acknowledges that, at one level, a spirit of meanness is nothing new in America, as demonstrated by the anti-Semitic and anti-New Deal views of Father Charles Coughlin in the 1930s, the rabid political intolerance by Senator Joseph McCarthy in the early 1950s, or the racial segregationism of Alabama Governor George Wallace in the 1960s.
Having experienced the underside of populist rhetoric in segregationism and opposition to civil rights, I'm perhaps especially sensitive to the fact that a lot of nastiness can lie under labels like "the people.