segregation

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seg·re·ga·tion

 (sĕg′rĭ-gā′shən)
n.
1. The act or process of segregating or the condition of being segregated.
2. The policy or practice of separating people of different races, classes, or ethnic groups, as in schools, housing, and public or commercial facilities, especially as a form of discrimination.
3. Genetics The separation of paired alleles or homologous chromosomes, especially during meiosis, so that the members of each pair appear in different gametes.

segregation

(ˌsɛɡrɪˈɡeɪʃən)
n
1. the act of segregating or state of being segregated
2. (Sociology) sociol the practice or policy of creating separate facilities within the same society for the use of a minority group
3. (Genetics) genetics the separation at meiosis of the two members of any pair of alleles into separate gametes. See also Mendel's laws
4. (Metallurgy) metallurgy the process in which a component of an alloy or solid solution separates in small regions within the solid or on the solid's surface
ˌsegreˈgational adj

seg•re•ga•tion

(ˌsɛg rɪˈgeɪ ʃən)

n.
1. the act or practice of segregating.
2. the state of being segregated.
3. something segregated.
4. the separation of allelic genes into different gametes during meiosis.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.segregation - (genetics) the separation of paired alleles during meiosis so that members of each pair of alleles appear in different gametessegregation - (genetics) the separation of paired alleles during meiosis so that members of each pair of alleles appear in different gametes
genetic science, genetics - the branch of biology that studies heredity and variation in organisms
meiosis, miosis, reduction division - (genetics) cell division that produces reproductive cells in sexually reproducing organisms; the nucleus divides into four nuclei each containing half the chromosome number (leading to gametes in animals and spores in plants)
biological process, organic process - a process occurring in living organisms
2.segregation - a social system that provides separate facilities for minority groups
social organisation, social organization, social structure, social system, structure - the people in a society considered as a system organized by a characteristic pattern of relationships; "the social organization of England and America is very different"; "sociologists have studied the changing structure of the family"
racial segregation - segregation by race
de facto segregation - segregation (especially in schools) that happens in fact although not required by law
de jure segregation - segregation that is imposed by law
sex segregation, purdah - the traditional Hindu or Muslim system of keeping women secluded
white separatism - a social system in which white people live separately from members of other races
3.segregation - the act of segregating or sequestering; "sequestration of the jury"
separation - the social act of separating or parting company; "the separation of church and state"
desegregation, integrating, integration - the action of incorporating a racial or religious group into a community

segregation

noun separation, discrimination, apartheid, isolation, partitioning, setting apart, keeping apart a law which will end compulsory racial segregation in prisons

segregation

noun
1. The act or process of isolating:
2. The policy or practice of political, legal, economic, or social discrimination, as against the members of a minority group:
Translations
فَصْل، عَزْل
oddělení
adskillelse
különválasztás
aîskilnaîur
ayırım

segregation

[ˌsegrɪˈgeɪʃən] Nsegregación f, separación f
racial segregationla segregación racial

segregation

[ˌsɛgrɪˈgeɪʃən] nségrégation f

segregation

nTrennung f; racial/sexual segregationRassen-/Geschlechtertrennung f

segregation

[ˌsɛgrɪˈgeɪʃn] nsegregazione f

segregate

(ˈsegrigeit) verb
to separate from others; to keep (people, groups etc) apart from each other. At the swimming-pool, the sexes are segregated.
ˌsegreˈgation (-ʃən) noun
References in periodicals archive ?
Board of Education, segregationist leaders proposed a program of "massive resistance" and segregation at all costs, yet cracks nevertheless began to appear as some white southerners, including journalists, began to question the goals and methods of the segregationists.
disciplined nonviolence, so too did segregationists like Kilpatrick feel
During this time, tensions were high--African Americans fought for their rights while White segregationists were determined to silence their efforts with brutality and aggression.
If not, why should the church deny Communion to segregationists but not pro-abortion politicians?
Ferguson case, which illustrates the illogic of maintaining a stringent racial divide, did not challenge the certitudes of Southern segregationists.
The scene in which the three white children are escorted by police past angry banner-waving segregationists vividly evokes the American South of the early 1960s, albeit in reverse.
He is careful not to categorize all Alabama Catholics as segregationists and all Georgia Catholics as integrationists, choosing instead to highlight the collective disorder that so permeated the biracial communities of Catholics in both states.
Smith's steadfast commentaries against liquor racketeering, gambling and official corruption had made her some powerful enemies long before her campaign to curb police brutality against Negroes had led segregationists to label her a nigger lover and Communist and to start a rival paper to run her out of business.
Staunch segregationists on school boards and in school attorney positions began to be threatened by the Ku Klux Klan when they acted to avoid loss of funding for their districts for the white children.
The monograph's main argument is that white segregationists rallied against the post-World War II Civil Rights Movement because they believed that it was part of a foreign, Communist-inspired conspiracy that threatened the (white) "southern way of life.
Only a few decades ago, Democratic segregationists such as Strom Thurmond and Jesse Helms did indeed move over to the GOP.