seismologist


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seis·mol·o·gy

 (sīz-mŏl′ə-jē)
n.
The geophysical science of earthquakes and the mechanical properties of the earth.

seis′mo·log′ic (-mə-lŏj′ĭk), seis′mo·log′i·cal (-ĭ-kəl) adj.
seis′mo·log′i·cal·ly adv.
seis·mol′o·gist n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.seismologist - a geophysicist who studies earthquakes and the mechanical characteristics of the Earth
geophysicist - a geologist who uses physical principles to study the properties of the earth
Translations
عالِم زلازِل
seismolog
seismolog
földrengéskutató
skjálftafræîingur
seizmológ
deprem bilimcisismolog

seismologist

[saɪzˈmɒlədʒɪst] Nsismólogo/a m/f

seismologist

[saɪzˈmɒlədʒɪst] nsismologue mf

seismologist

nSeismologe m, → Seismologin f

seismic

(ˈsaizmik) adjective
of earthquakes. seismic disturbances.
seisˈmology (-ˈmolədʒi) noun
the science or study of earthquakes.
ˌseismoˈlogical (-ˈlo-) adjective
seisˈmologist noun
References in periodicals archive ?
and was centered five miles west of Fillmore in Ventura County, said Caltech seismologist Nick Scheckel.
2 quake shook an area of southern San Bernardino County on Thursday, a seismologist reported.
Creager, a seismologist at the University of Washington in Seattle.
An analogy is dropping a rock in a pond of water,'' said Gerry Simila, a CSUN seismologist advising the student project.
The Big One on the San Andreas, however, would generate longer, stronger waves that lose energy more slowly, said Ned Field, a seismologist for the earthquake center at USC.
Wiens, a seismologist at Washington University in St.
To help officials recognize slow quakes that, at first glance, might seem too small to produce dangerous waves, seismologist Emile A.
and was centered one mile south of the city, said seismologist Doug Given.
It's become clear that the inner core is a lot more complex than we've given it credit for," says seismologist Kenneth C.
Realizing that winds on Earth could potentially have the same effect, Kobayashi alerted Kazunari Nawa, a seismologist at Nagoya University who was studying records from an extremely sensitive gravity meter stationed at the South Pole.
The good thing we can do with these signals is have quick information on the magnitude of the quake," says Martin Vall`e, a seismologist at the Paris Institute of Earth Physics.
Luckily, the chance that a magnitude 5 earthquake or larger would be caused by the smaller rumbles subsided by Sunday night, according to Egill Hauksson, a seismologist at the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.