selenium


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se·le·ni·um

 (sĭ-lē′nē-əm)
n. Symbol Se
A nonmetallic element, red in powder form, black in vitreous form, and metallic gray in stable crystalline form, resembling sulfur and found as an impurity in pyrites or obtained as a byproduct of electrolytic copper refining. It is widely used in rectifiers, as a semiconductor, and in xerography. Its photovoltaic and photoconductive actions make it useful in photocells, photographic exposure meters, and solar cells. Atomic number 34; atomic weight 78.96; melting point (gray) 221°C; boiling point (gray) 685°C; specific gravity (gray) 4.79; (vitreous) 4.28; valence 2, 4, or 6. See Periodic Table.

[Greek selēnē, moon (from selas, light, brightness) + -ium.]

selenium

(sɪˈliːnɪəm)
n
(Elements & Compounds) a nonmetallic element that exists in several allotropic forms. It occurs free in volcanic areas and in sulphide ores, esp pyrite. The common form is a grey crystalline solid that is photoconductive, photovoltaic, and semiconducting: used in photocells, solar cells, and in xerography. Symbol: Se; atomic no: 34; atomic wt: 78.96; valency: –2, 4, or 6; relative density: 4.79 (grey); melting pt: 221°C (grey); boiling pt: 685°C (grey)
[C19: from New Latin, from Greek selēnē moon; named by analogy to tellurium (from Latin tellus earth)]

se•le•ni•um

(sɪˈli ni əm)

n.
a nonmetallic element occurring in several allotropic forms and having an electrical resistance that varies under the influence of light. Symbol: Se; at. wt.: 78.96; at. no.: 34; sp. gr.: (gray) 4.80 at 25°C, (red) 4.50 at 25°C.
[< New Latin (1818) < Greek selḗn(ē) moon + New Latin -ium -ium2]

se·le·ni·um

(sĭ-lē′nē-əm)
Symbol Se A nonmetallic element that can exist as a gray crystal, a red powder, or a black glassy material. It can convert light directly into electricity, and its ability to conduct electricity increases as light striking it becomes more intense. Because of this, selenium is used in copy machines, photography, and solar cells. Atomic number 34. See Periodic Table.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.selenium - a toxic nonmetallic element related to sulfur and telluriumselenium - a toxic nonmetallic element related to sulfur and tellurium; occurs in several allotropic forms; a stable grey metallike allotrope conducts electricity better in the light than in the dark and is used in photocells; occurs in sulfide ores (as pyrite)
chemical element, element - any of the more than 100 known substances (of which 92 occur naturally) that cannot be separated into simpler substances and that singly or in combination constitute all matter
fool's gold, iron pyrite, pyrite - a common mineral (iron disulfide) that has a pale yellow color
antioxidant - substance that inhibits oxidation or inhibits reactions promoted by oxygen or peroxides
Translations
селен
selen
selen
seleen
seleeni
selenij
szelén
selen
セレン
seleenselenium
selen
selen
selen
selen
селен

selenium

[sɪˈliːnɪəm] Nselenio m

selenium

nSelen nt

selenium

n selenio
References in periodicals archive ?
The geldings that received selenium, mineral and vitamin supplements and special feed had an appropriate level of selenium in the blood.
kosmik is Selenium is an open source tool for web application testing.
The Prevention of Alzheimer's Disease by Vitamin E and Selenium (PREADViSE) trial was piggybacked onto a larger randomised controlled trial looking at the antioxidant effects of selenium and vitamin E on the incidence of prostate cancer.
This was a hospital-based comparative study of selenium in HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected children carried out between October 2013 and August 2014 at the UNTH.
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Although selenium is an essential element for humans and animals, elevated levels of selenium in soil and water found near coal, phosphate, uranium and some metal mines can be toxic to human health, affect agricultural productivity and the stability of natural ecosystems.
Selenium can deal with any program which bolsters JavaScript as it has been assembled utilizing JavaScript.
Women were randomized to take 200 meg selenium per day or placebo for 6 months.
Selenium (Se) toxicity, also referred as selenosis, is a serious threat when excess of Selenium is found in soils.
The study "highlights that selenium in the brain is something we can't continue to ignore," he says.
Researchers in a variety of biological sciences and medical specialties explore the various functions of the essential trace element selenium in human health and disease.
This change requires a minimum of 2 micrograms per kilocalories and a maximum of 7 micrograms per 100 kilocalories of selenium in infant formula.