self-accusation


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self-accusation

n
the act of criticizing oneself for something one has done or feels one may be responsible for
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.self-accusation - an admission that you have failed to do or be something you know you should do or be
confession - an admission of misdeeds or faults
accusal, accusation - a formal charge of wrongdoing brought against a person; the act of imputing blame or guilt
References in classic literature ?
While he was angry therefore with the incontinence of Jones, he was no less pleased with the honour and honesty of his self-accusation.
The idealization of the sufferer is carried still further in the Gorgias, in which the thesis is maintained, that 'to suffer is better than to do evil;' and the art of rhetoric is described as only useful for the purpose of self-accusation.
Self-accusation was too painful to him--he could not face it.
She hastened after this brief self-accusation to give Ivanhoe what information she could; but it amounted only to this, that the Templar Bois-Guilbert, and the Baron Front-de-B
Fogg, he overwhelmed himself with bitter self-accusations.
Miss Bartlett burst into self-accusations and regrets.
All the hints and affirmations of others I treated as malignant, baseless slanders; your own self-accusations I believed to be overstrained; and all that seemed unaccountable in your position I trusted that you could account for if you chose.
Roxana stood awhile looking mutely down on him while he writhed in shame and went on incoherently babbling self-accusations mixed with pitiful attempts at explanation and palliation of his crime; then she seated herself and took off her hat, and her unkept masses of long brown hair tumbled down about her shoulders.
The believer's feelings of self-accusation and his awareness of his sins should be more acute when he is in health and prosperity.
He considered Nasrallah's talk about weapons provided both to the Syrian regime and the opposition due to the loose borders as a self-accusation and a response to all the March 8 coalition's claims.
It includes self-acceptance, self-interest, self-accusation, self-confidence, an expectation of others' attitudes, a global self-assessment, and other components (Frolov, 1997).