self-aggrandizing


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self-ag·gran·dize·ment

(sĕlf′ə-grăn′dĭz-mənt)
n.
The act or practice of enhancing or exaggerating one's own importance, power, or reputation.

self′-ag·gran′diz′ing (-ə-grăn′dī′zĭng) adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.self-aggrandizing - of or relating to or characteristic of self-aggrandizement
2.self-aggrandizing - exhibiting self-importanceself-aggrandizing - exhibiting self-importance; "big talk"
proud - feeling self-respect or pleasure in something by which you measure your self-worth; or being a reason for pride; "proud parents"; "proud of his accomplishments"; "a proud moment"; "proud to serve his country"; "a proud name"; "proud princes"
References in periodicals archive ?
brought the "Chicago Way" of self-aggrandizing political corruption to the nation.
Claire does not provide much information about herself, though she presents as self-aggrandizing and temperamental.
Pray tell, can Russia be any different, given its own self-aggrandizing, back-stabbing and double-talking regime?
There followed such memorable mileposts as six appearances on "Seinfeld" as self-aggrandizing dentist Tim Whatley, seven seasons as the goofy dad, Hal Wilkerson, on "Malcolm in the Middle" and, most triumphantly, five seasons on "Breaking Bad" as Walter White, the emotionally defeated high school chemistry teacher turned psychopathic drug lord.
This volume disputes this self-aggrandizing Westphalia drama.
Conversely, lower-ranked firms tend to sporadically push self-aggrandizing material about themselves and their lawyers.
Atwood's sly take on the love affairs of middling, self-aggrandizing poet Gavin Putnam and his female muses is flawless.
A self-aggrandizing ruling class that fails to understand the rest of humanity.
Indeed, some biographies, autobiographies, and memoirs are self-aggrandizing and, like clothes and buttons merely deal with the exterior.
The liberal media easily dismissed Hillary Clinton's self-aggrandizing lie as a trivial faux pax.
Too often, we know, memoirs can be manipulative, self-aggrandizing, or downright made upthe name James Frey stands for a whole moral case against the genre.
These perspectives are identified as (a) the self-denigrating perspective, (b) the clear and balanced perspective, and (c) the self-aggrandizing perspective.