self-concept

(redirected from self-concepts)
Also found in: Medical.

self-con·cept

(sĕlf′kŏn′sĕpt)
n.
The mental image or perception that one has of oneself.

self-concept

n
(Psychology) psychol the whole set of attitudes, opinions, and cognitions that a person has of himself
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References in periodicals archive ?
Confidence and aspirations: Self-esteem and self-concepts as predictors of students' life goals.
Interest and Competence as Components of Academic Self-Concepts for the Self Description Questionnaire I, Paper presented at the XXVI International Congress of Psychology, Montreal, Canada
The self-concepts questionnaire consists of six dimension.
Narrowing the focus to academic self-concept, research suggests that it is itself a multidimensional construct (Byrne, 1996; Marsh & Ayotte, 2003) Incorporating still narrower literacy and numeracy self-concepts among others, at least for children of school-going age (Marsh & Ayotte, 2003; Marsh & Martin, 2011).
Marsh, Trautwein, Ludtke, Koller, and Baumert (2006) projected the multidimensional side of self-concept, for the explanation of diverse aspects of persons' personal and social dimensions that in turn reveal complex and dynamic organizations of adolescents' self-concepts.
Although adequate research has been done on students' academic self-concepts, teachers' professional self-concept has not received much attention in previous research.
Similarly, Rosenberg, Schooler, Schoenbach, and Rosenberg (1995) stated in their study that "children with poor academic self-concepts are often described as having low self-esteem71" (p.
In effect, the program seeks to improve each participant's physical, social, and global self-concepts.
In relation to those participants with a mild muscle dissatisfaction, they felt more physically attractive, and showed improvement in the two self-concepts compared to participants belonging to the population at risk of suffering muscle dysmorphia (category 3) and those who may suffer it (category 4).
Programming in which the students process their gender and notions of masculinity relative to racial/ethnic expectations and stereotyping may help young Black/African men to develop genuine self-concepts that may serve as a foundation for healthy psychological and academic functioning while in school.
Learning disabled children's Self-concepts, Review of Educational Research, 58, 347-371.