self-concept

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self-con·cept

(sĕlf′kŏn′sĕpt)
n.
The mental image or perception that one has of oneself.

self-concept

n
(Psychology) psychol the whole set of attitudes, opinions, and cognitions that a person has of himself
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The qualitative data support the findings that participants in the experimental groups gained a greater awareness and clarity regarding their vocational self-concepts and a greater belief in the relevancy of work-related daydreams.
As Baker attempts to show in the third and fourth chapters, the available reductive strategies articulated by John Perry, David Lewis or the cognitive sciences, and the eliminative strategies suggested by Daniel Dennett and particularly Thomas Metzinger (whose position Baker discusses with great acumen) are ultimately unable to reveal appeal to self-concepts to be superfluous.
More recent findings suggest that pupils with lower reading self-concepts performed more poorly on reading tasks and had lower overall academic self-concept scores (Chapman, Tunmer, & Prochnow, 2000).
The PISA data include a large number of variables; among them are a test score in reading, self-concepts of ability, information on the household, and information on cross-curricular competencies.
Firstly, the current study was not limited to mathematics self-concepts but also examined BFLPE moderation for mathematics, verbal and science self-concepts using three databases, making this a quasi-longitudinal study.
Since there are fewer differences between elementary school and junior high at a K-8 school, it is hypothesized that self-concepts should remain stable.
Research in social psychology has shown that individuals are likely to use certain cognitive strategies to shape their own self-concepts.
Romantic partners develop shared friends, activities and even overlapping self-concepts.
Age and gender effects in physical self-concepts for adolescent elite athletes and non-athletes: A multicohort-multioccasion design.
While individuals may have an overall sense of self-concept, research suggests that holistic self-concept is actually a complex construction of many domain-specific sub-categories, such as academic, social, or psychological self-concepts (Gest, Rulison, Davidson, & Welsh, 2008; Harter, 1996; Shavelson & Bolus, 1982).
The influences of the dominant culture occurring through institutionalized racial practices may have a negative effect on the self-concepts of minorities (see Twenge & Crocker, 2002).
Next, the self-concepts of respondents were rated with respect to the same characteristics.