self-cultivation


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Noun1.self-cultivation - the process of educating yourself
education - the gradual process of acquiring knowledge; "education is a preparation for life"; "a girl's education was less important than a boy's"
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The same zeal for self-improvement, which led him to steal the much coveted arts of reading and writing, amid all the toil and discouragements of his early life, still led him to devote all his leisure time to self-cultivation.
Saying he still holds it as a special memory that he happened to learn from a famous calligrapher as a high school student, he added that practicing calligraphy is a great way for self-cultivation.
It is based on a poem by Bai Juyi in the Tang Dynasty in which water is used metaphorically to mean self-cultivation.
edu/5010230/Eating_Your_Way_to_Immortality_Early_Daoist_Self-Cultivation_Diets) Eating Your Way to Immortality: Early Daoist Self-Cultivation Diets ," notes that among the rules is the concept of "bigu," which is the avoidance of grain: rice, wheat, oats, millet and beans.
She examines their efforts from the perspective of ritual performance, particularly musical performance, and its role in the creation of such key texts as the Book of Odes for purposes of education and self-cultivation.
One was a "writing-women culture," which emphasized elite women's self-cultivation through moralistic maternal teaching and the acquisition of literary skills (23).
From the novel, one can learn that the social and cultural environment in Poland is hardly favorable for Isaac's self-cultivation of menschlichkeit.
This process of self-cultivation allows for a fourth stage of mutually redefining the mentoring relationship toward long-term friendship or going in separate directions.
In the following three chapters, Johnson shares his views on where moral values come from: organic functioning and well-being, interpersonal relations, social interactions and institutions, and self-cultivation.
Towler notes that he is not using direct translations of the eighty-one verses, but instead draws from several leading translations and his own deep practice to determine "the clearest way to present each step, or chapter, as it pertains to self-cultivation.
They create a middle landscape as a site for self-cultivation, advocate for African Americans, and lead social reform.
As well, we see just how extraordinarily difficult and psychologically trying such a program of self-cultivation could be.