self-harm


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self-harm

(sĕlf′-härm′)

self-harm

n
(Psychology) the practice of cutting or otherwise wounding oneself, usually considered as indicating psychological disturbance
ˌself-ˈharming n
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References in periodicals archive ?
Objective: The aim of present study was to assess the relationship between depressions, anxiety, and stress and self-harm.
Women have of self-harm forces Official figures from the Ministry of Defence show that for every 1,000 members of the armed forces, 2.
Women have of self-harm forces sy w 0 Official figures from the Ministry of Defence show that for every 1,000 members of the armed forces, 2.
The army of self-harm Service That means they do not show the total number of self-harm incidents, as each person might have selfharmed several times.
A new study, based on data from GP practices across Britain, has found that between 2011 and 2014 there was a 68% increase in reports of self-harm among girls aged 13 to 16.
THE UK has one of the highest rates of self-harm in Europe.
Self-harm can take many forms including substance abuse
Changing your body Distractions: Distract yourself from the urge to self-harm by listening to loud music, doing something creative like painting or writing, watching funny video clips online or counting backwards from 100 in your head.
C [USA], October 19 (ANI): Teenage girls are more likely to self-harm than boys, a new study suggests.
The Institutes Director, Anne Hollonds said the study involving 3, 318 teenagers from the Longitudinal Study of Australian Children found that girls were at greater risk of self-harm and suicide than boys.
They found that the risk of suicide was no higher among the 5-ARI users, but the relative risk of self-harm was significantly higher for the first 18 months after starting treatment but not thereafter, and the relative risk of depression was significantly higher in the first 18 months, but declined afterward.