self-interest


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self-in·ter·est

(sĕlf′ĭn′trĭst, -ĭn′tər-ĭst)
n.
1. Selfish or excessive regard for one's personal advantage or interest.
2. Personal advantage or interest.

self′-in′ter·est·ed adj.

self-interest

n
1. one's personal interest or advantage
2. the act or an instance of pursuing one's own interest
ˌself-ˈinterested adj
ˌself-ˈinterestedness n

self`-in′terest



n.
1. regard for one's own interest or advantage, esp. with disregard for others.
2. personal interest or advantage.
[1640–50]
self`-in′terested, adj.
self`-in′terestedness, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.self-interest - taking advantage of opportunities without regard for the consequences for others
selfishness - stinginess resulting from a concern for your own welfare and a disregard of others
2.self-interest - concern for your own interests and welfare
trait - a distinguishing feature of your personal nature

self-interest

noun selfishness, egotism, self-centredness, greed, looking out for number one (informal) The current protests are motivated purely by self-interest.
Translations

self-interest

[ˌselfˈɪntrɪst] Ninterés m propio

self-interest

[ˌsɛlfˈɪntrɪst] ninteresse m personale

self-interest

(selfˈintrəst) noun
consideration only for one's own aims and advantages. He acted out of self-interest.
References in classic literature ?
For me the district institutions simply mean the liability to pay fourpence halfpenny for every three acres, to drive into the town, sleep with bugs, and listen to all sorts of idiocy and loathsomeness, and self-interest offers me no inducement.
I imagine," he said, "that no sort of activity is likely to be lasting if it is not founded on self-interest, that's a universal principle, a philosophical principle," he said, repeating the word "philosophical" with determination, as though wishing to show that he had as much right as any one else to talk of philosophy.
It is argued that self-interest will prevent excessive cruelty; as if self-interest protected our domestic animals, which are far less likely than degraded slaves, to stir up the rage of their savage masters.
And if you should feel your own self-interest pressing upon your heart too closely, then think of Eliot's Indian Bible.
He gazed at the great houses without respect or envy, at the men with a fierce contempt, at the women with a sore feeling that if by chance he should be brought into contact with any of them they would regard him as a sort of wild animal, to be hurnoured or avoided purely as a matter of self-interest.
Self-interest may prompt falsity of the tongue; but if one prove to be a liar, nothing that he says can ever be believed.
Elinor was soon called to the card-table by the conclusion of the first rubber, and the confidential discourse of the two ladies was therefore at an end, to which both of them submitted without any reluctance, for nothing had been said on either side to make them dislike each other less than they had done before; and Elinor sat down to the card table with the melancholy persuasion that Edward was not only without affection for the person who was to be his wife; but that he had not even the chance of being tolerably happy in marriage, which sincere affection on HER side would have given, for self-interest alone could induce a woman to keep a man to an engagement, of which she seemed so thoroughly aware that he was weary.
Benevolence, devotedness, enthusiasm, were her antipathies; for dissimulation and self-interest she had a preference--they were real wisdom in her eyes; moral and physical degradation, mental and bodily inferiority, she regarded with indulgence; they were foils capable of being turned to good account as set-offs for her own endowments.
These two characters are not always received in the world with the different regard which seems severally due to either; and which one would imagine mankind, from self-interest, should show towards them.
Both you and your daughter could only have interpreted any such action on my part as instigated by self-interest, for you both knew that I wanted to make her my wife," replied the other.
Whether out of compassion for them, or in furtherance of his own self-interests, it would be difficult to say.
In the Forward to Grisham's book, former Governor William Winter calls Tupelo "a place where people have learned not to dismiss their own personal self-interest, but to equate it with the interest of their community"