self-reflection


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self-re·flec·tion

(sĕlf′rĭ-flĕk′shən)
n.
Self-examination; introspection.

self′-re·flec′tive adj.
self′-re·flec′tive·ly adv.
References in periodicals archive ?
Stagnation is no longer an option because the trigger event is viewed as an opportunity for continued growth through self-reflection.
Notably, holistic nursing incorporates as a core value holistic nurse self-reflection and self-care (ANA & AHNA, 2013).
The research, conducted by psychological scientists Francesca Gino of Harvard Business School and Cassie Mogilner of The Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania, shows that implicitly activating the concept of time cuts cheating behavior by encouraging people to engage in self-reflection.
EGO DOCUMENTA: THE TESTAMENT OF MY EGO IN THE MUSEUM OF MY MIND provides a visual art document from filmmaker, curator and visual Dutch artist Felix de Rooy, and is a recommendation for any arts collection interested in the juxtaposition of intellect, art, and self-reflection.
Archbishop Chrysostomos on Thursday suggested to former President Demetris Christofias that he engage in a little self-reflection.
A structured preclinical workshop combined with self-reflection provided insight into students' perceptions of the psychiatric mental health clinical experience.
Self-reflection is very likely to enhance the accuracy of situation-, task- and self-awareness that are in turn critical components in self-regulation learning (de Bruin, Rikers, & Schmidt, 2005; Greene & Azevedo, 2007).
In many of these teaching experiences, teachers reflect individually using a written self-reflection form to capture their thoughts.
He contrasts Goethe's treatment of self-reflection with that of Friedrich Schlegel in Lucinda, Novalis in Heinrich von Ofterdingen, and Clemens Brentano in Godwi.
Steering a Drifting Ship: Improving the Preparation of First-Year Catholic School Teachers Through Self-Reflection
Specifically, the HCMCD incorporates the following attitudes and behaviors that are needed for effective career self-management: (a) hope, (b) self-reflection, (e) self-clarity, (d) visioning, (e) goal setting/planning, and (f) implementing/adapting (Niles et al.
The use of such a description is more than likely a self-reflection on the work of those who expect to find that all they do is not normally as it should be.