self-reproach


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self-re·proach

(sĕlf′rĭ-prōch′)
n.
The act or an instance of charging oneself with a fault or mistake.

self′-re·proach′ful adj.
self′-re·proach′ful·ly adv.

self-reproach

n
the act of finding fault with or blaming oneself
ˌself-reˈproachful adj
ˌself-reˈproachfully adv

self′-reproach′



n.
blame or censure by one's own conscience.
[1770–80]
self′-reproach′ful, self′-reproach′ing, adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.self-reproach - a feeling of deep regret (usually for some misdeed)self-reproach - a feeling of deep regret (usually for some misdeed)
regret, ruefulness, sorrow, rue - sadness associated with some wrong done or some disappointment; "he drank to drown his sorrows"; "he wrote a note expressing his regret"; "to his rue, the error cost him the game"
guilt feelings, guilt trip, guilty conscience, guilt - remorse caused by feeling responsible for some offense
penance, penitence, repentance - remorse for your past conduct
2.self-reproach - the act of blaming yourself
reproach - a mild rebuke or criticism; "words of reproach"
Translations

self-reproach

[ˌselfrɪˈprəʊtʃ] Nremordimiento m
References in classic literature ?
And if there were such a thing as taking averages of feeling, it would certainly be found that in the hunting and shooting seasons regret, self-reproach, and mortified pride weigh lighter on country gentlemen than in late spring and summer.
But you wouldn't have married me then, Nancy, if I'd told you," said Godfrey, urged, in the bitterness of his self-reproach, to prove to himself that his conduct had not been utter folly.
In making me the offer, you must have satisfied the delicacy of your feelings with regard to my family, and may take possession of Longbourn estate whenever it falls, without any self-reproach.
My tranquillity as a woman--perhaps my dearest interests as a wife--depended absolutely on penetrating the mystery of my mother-in-law's conduct, and on discovering the true meaning of the wild words of penitence and self-reproach which my husband had addressed to me on our way home.
He had suffered, and he had learned to think: two advantages that he had never known before; and the self-reproach arising from the deplorable event in Wimpole Street, to which he felt himself accessory by all the dangerous intimacy of his unjustifiable theatre, made an impression on his mind which, at the age of six-and-twenty, with no want of sense or good companions, was durable in its happy effects.
But, though she noticed it, she was herself in such high spirits at that moment, so far from sorrow, sadness, or self-reproach, that she purposely deceived herself as young people often do.
A moralist might have said that at this point his mind should have been full of self-reproach for the suffering he had caused.
He showed the more respect to this queen, deprived of every mark of pomp and stripped of followers, as he felt some self-reproach for his own want of heart and his avarice.
Such," observed Captain Bonneville, "is the effect of self-reproach, even upon the roving trapper in the wilderness, who has little else to fear than the stings of his own guilty conscience.
Besides the jar of contrast there came to her a chill self-reproach that she had not returned sooner, to help her mother in these domesticities, instead of indulging herself out-of-doors.
His heart sank, and, half out of bed already, he stopped; he did not know how he was going to face her; he was overwhelmed with a sudden rush of self-reproach, and bitterly, bitterly, he regretted what he had done.
Whatever they may have been, however, she may now, and hereafter doubtless WILL turn with gratitude towards her own condition, when she compares it with that of my poor Eliza, when she considers the wretched and hopeless situation of this poor girl, and pictures her to herself, with an affection for him so strong, still as strong as her own, and with a mind tormented by self-reproach, which must attend her through life.