self-slaughter

self-slaugh·ter

(sĕlf′slô′tər)
n.
The killing of oneself; suicide.

self′-slaugh′ter



n.
suicide.
[1595–1605]
self′-slaugh′tered, adj.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Stephen Kinzer, who has written a popular history of the CIA-led coup of 1953, "All the Shah's Men," said, "This shocking act of self-slaughter was the latest violent tragedy in the long history of a family drenched in blood--first that of the Iranians it tortured and killed, then its own.
Self-slaughter is the central concern of Herostratus, which Levy shot between 1963 and 1965, after making several other shorts and doing a stint at London's Slade School of Fine Art, which by the mid-'60s was a locus of British experimental filmmaking.
However, even this character is a paradox, as she is the disobedient daughter who even disobeys God in the end with her self-slaughter.
In Hamlet, of course, the prince tells us: "The Lord hath set his cannon against self-slaughter.
What lay behind these often heart-wrenching individual narratives of self-slaughter remains unavoidably obscure to us, though Morrissey offers some suggestive readings of suicides' efforts to speak through death.
over gay clergy, the Lambeth lambs plan to complete their self-slaughter by approving of women bishops.
The book is constructed as its hero's seriously belated attempt to see the shape of his life and to understand the reasons for his self-slaughter, but it also becomes, in the end, a kind of love story, one-way and unrequited, between the dead and the still living.
The logic underlying this semiotics runs: "[w]ithout the woman's self-slaughter there is no rape" (28) and without "the racializing of Lucrece's rape" (45) there is no redemption for the white(ned) woman.
predecessors in English, self-murder and self-slaughter, carries with it severely negative moral connotations.