self-sow

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self-sow

(sĕlf′sō′)
intr.v. self-sowed (-sōd′), self-sown or self-sowed, self-sow·ing, self-sows
To reproduce or spread by natural dispersion of seed: a plant that self-sows readily.

self-sow

(or self-seeding) A term that describes a plant that, without assistance, sheds viable seed which germinate around the parent plant.
References in periodicals archive ?
I always have achillea in the spring-summer garden for it self-sows so willingly.
It self-sows freely - just thin the seedlings for a repeat performance next year.
Basil is one that readily self-sows in our garden and Ocimum basilicum (sweet basil) is an absolute favourite with its large, emerald-green leaves.
Annual delphinium, by contrast, blooms without requiring any special attention and then self-sows, increasing its friendly presence in the garden from year to year.
Harvest most of the rosettes but let a few flowers form seeds; mache self-sows readily, so next year's crop is likely to seed itself.
Self-sows prolifically thanks to small, dandelion-like parachutes on the seeds.
The other CSUN milkweed, Tweedia caerulea, is a soft baby blue that will vine its way upward for several feet and self-sows in the garden.
It self-sows without conscience and, in Florida, has become a major pest tree, taking over thousands of acres of ecologically sensitive sites in the Everglades.
It has a licorice fragrance when crushed and, although it develops as a biennial (blooming, setting seeds and dying in its second year) in the Valley, it self-sows reliably upon its demise.
Nasturtium self-sows and will spread through your garden without a lot of effort on your part.
It prefers not-too-rich soil, and it self-sows profusely.
Growing to less than 1 foot in height, Geranium incanum self-sows with abandon but is easily deracinated if you should be bothered by where it travels in your garden.