self-trust

self-trust

(sĕlf′trŭst′)
n.
Self-confidence.
References in classic literature ?
That need makes in morals the capital virtue of self-trust.
The other terror that scares us from self-trust is our consistency; a reverence for our past act or word because the eyes of others have no other data for computing our orbit than our past acts, and we are loath to disappoint them.
The magnetism which all original action exerts is explained when we inquire the reason of self-trust.
I have been blessed in my academic life as a student with teachers who had the right priorities for their students' growth: authenticity, fierce devotion to the music and self-trust.
The first function of autonomy is to ground a collection of attitudes towards ourselves, including self-trust and self-respect.
The boy received psychotherapy sessions at the QFPWC to increase his self-trust with the co-operation of his father.
Some authors, like McLeod, differentiate between self-esteem, self-trust, self-confidence, and self-worth.
Self-trust is common to all the artists featured in this year's Music Issue.
The examination of trust begins with self-trust, in which the author looks at personal credibility and how to create it based on four core values.
Change is not to be feared, but rather embraced with confidence and self-trust.
Keith Lehrer, in Self Trust: A Study of Reason, Knowledge, and Autonomy, (4) describes self-trust as the ability to trust oneself to trust wisely and authentically.
9) Accordingly he insists that the ideal of democratic individuality is not complete independence but rather the interlocking virtues of courage and self-trust that allows citizens to resist conformity.