sell off


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sell

 (sĕl)
v. sold (sōld), sell·ing, sells
v.tr.
1. To exchange or deliver for money or its equivalent: We sold our old car for a modest sum.
2. To offer or have available for sale: The store sells health foods.
3. To give up or surrender in exchange for a price or reward: sell one's soul to the devil.
4. To be purchased in (a certain quantity); achieve sales of: a book that sold a million copies.
5.
a. To bring about or encourage sales of; promote: Good publicity sold the product.
b. To cause to be accepted; advocate successfully: We sold the proposal to the school committee.
6. To persuade (another) to recognize the worth or desirability of something: They sold me on the idea.
v.intr.
1. To exchange ownership for money or its equivalent; engage in selling: Are any of the fruit vendors still selling?
2. To be sold or be on sale: Grapes are selling high this season.
3. To attract prospective buyers; be popular on the market: an item that doesn't sell.
4. To be approved of; gain acceptance: an idea that just wouldn't sell.
n.
1. An act or instance of selling: ordered a sell of his shares in the company.
2. Something that sells or gains acceptance in a particular way: Their program to raise taxes will be a difficult sell.
3. Slang A deception; a hoax.
Phrasal Verbs:
sell off
To get rid of by selling, often at reduced prices.
sell out
1. To sell all of a supply of something: We have sold out of that model.
2. To cause (someone) to have sold an entire supply of something: The bakery is sold out of those pastries.
3. To be entirely sold: Her new novel has sold out.
4. Slang To betray one's principles or colleagues: He sold out to the other side.
sell through
To be purchased as a retail item by a customer: The clothes are in the store, but they aren't selling through.
Idioms:
sell a bill of goods Informal
To take unfair advantage of.
sell down the river Informal
To betray the trust or faith of.
sell short
1. To contract for the sale of securities or commodities one expects to own at a later date and at more advantageous terms.
2. To underestimate the true value or worth of: Don't sell your colleague short; she's a smart lawyer.

[Middle English sellen, from Old English sellan, to give, sell.]

sell′a·ble adj.

sell off

vb
(Commerce) (tr, adverb) to sell (remaining or unprofitable items), esp at low prices
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.sell off - get rid of by selling, usually at reduced prices; "The store sold off the surplus merchandise"
sell - exchange or deliver for money or its equivalent; "He sold his house in January"; "She sells her body to survive and support her drug habit"

sell

verb
1. To offer for sale:
2. To succeed in causing (a person) to act in a certain way.Also used with on:
phrasal verb
sell for
1. To achieve (a certain price):
2. To require a specified price:
phrasal verb
sell off
To get rid of completely by selling, especially in quantity or at a discount:
phrasal verb
sell out
1. To get rid of completely by selling, especially in quantity or at a discount:
2. Slang. To be treacherous to:
Slang: rat (on).
Idiom: sell down the river .
noun
Translations
يَبْيعُيَبيعُ بِسُرْعَةٍ وأسْعار مُنْخَفِضَه
rozprodatvyprodat
realiseresælge ud
myydä
rasprodati
selja ódÿrt; losa sig viî
売り払う
싸게 팔아치우다
sälja av
ขายในราคาถูก
bán hạ giá

w>sell off

vt sepverkaufen; (= get rid of quickly, cheaply)abstoßen; (at auction) → versteigern

sell

(sel) past tense, past participle sold (sould) verb
1. to give something in exchange for money. He sold her a car; I've got some books to sell.
2. to have for sale. The farmer sells milk and eggs.
3. to be sold. His book sold well.
4. to cause to be sold. Packaging sells a product.
ˌsell-out noun
1. an event, especially a concert, for which all the tickets are sold. His concert was a sell-out.
2. a betrayal. The gang realized it was a sell-out and tried to escape.
be sold on
to be enthusiastic about. I'm sold on the idea of a holiday in Canada.
be sold out
1. to be no longer available. The second-hand records are all sold out; The concert is sold out.
2. to have no more available to be bought. We are sold out of children's socks.
sell down the river
to betray. The gang was sold down the river by one of its associates.
sell off
to sell quickly and cheaply. They're selling off their old stock.
sell out
1. (sometimes with of) to sell all of something. We sold out our entire stock.
2. to be all sold. The second-hand records sold out within minutes of the sale starting.
sell up
to sell a house, business etc. He has sold up his share of the business.

sell off

يَبْيعُ rozprodat sælge ud verkaufen εκποιώ liquidar myydä solder rasprodati liquidare 売り払う 싸게 팔아치우다 uitverkopen selge ut wyprzedać liquidar распродавать sälja av ขายในราคาถูก elden çıkarmak bán hạ giá 廉价出售
References in classic literature ?
I returned to Horton Lodge about the middle of July, leaving my mother to conclude the bargain for the house, to obtain more pupils, to sell off the furniture of our old abode, and to fit out the new one.
And when the day come he sell off by a great auctioneer all the goods of that other man who own them.
The moment he married the widow, he would sell off all the furniture, and run away.
Campbell Robb, Shelter's chief executive, said: "At a time when millions of families are struggling to find somewhere affordable to live, plans to sell off large swathes of the few genuinely affordable homes we have left is only going to make things worse.
One sell-off scheme which has grown in popularity is the Right to Buy scheme, where local authorities sell off council housing stock.
uk The Government is to sell off its remaining 30% share of Royal Mail as part of PS4.
The decision to sell off property was taken by the Cabinet yesterday, with much of the discussion in private.
So if the government sell off the Royal Mail has the Queen given her consent to use her crown and ER, which is on all the letterboxes and postage stamps?
The United States Treasury Department is planning to sell off another 30 million shares in United States-based General Motors' (NYSE: GM).
The break-up could torpedo the Chancellor's aim to sell off a slice of the public's 81 per cent stake of the whole bank - potentially at a big loss - before the next general election.
Mr Dobson is correct that I was trying to single out Mr Cameron, as Mr Cameron is continuing the school field sell off project put in place by his Tory predecessors.
Purnima later came in touch with a man called Prabhas, who advised her to sell off her daughters.