semivowel


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sem·i·vow·el

 (sĕm′ĭ-vou′əl)
n.
A sound that has the quality of one of the high vowels, as (ē) or (o͞o), and that functions as a consonant before or after vowels, as the initial sounds of yell and well and the final sounds of coy and cow. Also called glide.

semivowel

(ˈsɛmɪˌvaʊəl)
n
1. (Phonetics & Phonology) a vowel-like sound that acts like a consonant, in that it serves the same function in a syllable carrying the same amount of prominence as a consonant relative to a true vowel, the nucleus of the syllable. In English and many other languages the chief semivowels are (w) in well and (j), represented as y, in yell
2. (Phonetics & Phonology) a frictionless continuant classified as one of the liquids; (l) or (r)
Also called (US and Canadian): glide

sem•i•vow•el

(ˈsɛm ɪˌvaʊ əl)

n.
a speech sound of vowel quality used as a consonant, as (w) in wet or (y) in yet.
[1520–30]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.semivowel - a vowellike sound that serves as a consonant
speech sound, phone, sound - (phonetics) an individual sound unit of speech without concern as to whether or not it is a phoneme of some language
palatal - a semivowel produced with the tongue near the palate (like the initial sound in the English word `yeast')
References in periodicals archive ?
Sievers' Law and the history of semivowel syllabicity in Indo-European and ancient Greek.
I found their division of the semivowel very performer-friendly.
In order to mark the triad ieu, in the first books the final component u was removed or replaced with the semivowel v(iev ~ ie).
In Middle English, the raising of the long front close vowel [e:] to [i:] operated in the two main contexts: (a) before <z> representing the palatalised voiced velar fricative which later became the semivowel [j], as in e.
1 I 2 SKIING 4 IVY 5 VAN 6 VIE 7 SILVIINE 9 SIX 10 OX 11 AXIS 12 TAXIING 14 REFLEXIVE 15 SEXVALENT 19 MAXIXE 40 AXLE 41 OXLIP 50 LA 51 LIE 52 NAUPLII 54 LIVE 55 SOLVE 56 PELVIC 57 SYLVIINE 59 HELIX 60 CALX 90 EXCEL 91 EXCITE 100 CAB 101 ACID 104 CIVET 150 CLAN 151 CLIP 154 PROCLIVITY 200 OCCUR 201 ACCIDENT 204 BACCIVOROUS 250 ACCLAIM 251 ACCLIMATISE 254 ACCLIVITY 500 DO 501 DIE 502 RADII 504 DIVE 505 ADVENT 506 ADVICE 509 RADIX 550 IDLE 551 IDLING 600 MADCAP 650 HEADCLOTH 900 ACME 901 ACMITE 1000 ME 1001 MINE 1002 GASTROCNEMII 1004 SEMIVOWEL 1005 DUUMVIR 1006 TRIUMVIR 1009 MIX 1050 DIMLY 1051 GREMLIN 1100 ARMCHAIR 1500 HUMDRUM 1501 HUMDINGER 2000 DUMMY 2001 COMMIT 2009 COMMIXTURE 2050 BUMMLE 2051 BUMMLING
yaw-), "find" (*yaud-), "boil" (*yausa-), and "chew" (*jyaw-), for which Parthian, Tatic, Gurani, and CDs have retained the initial semivowel *y-.
Here belong palatalisations and transformations of velar fricatives, devoicing of final plosives, metatheses, loss of [n] in unaccented syllables, transformations of some newly created sequences of consonants, processes of spirantisation and despirantisation, and an occasional loss of the semivowel [w], as in swylc > such, etc.
Among European languages that use the Roman alphabet, Finnish, Estonian, the Slavic languages, and all the Germanic languages other than English seem to use <j> for the semivowel, while most of the rest use <y> or <i>.
Thus, he believes that when the first consonant of the root was /w/ it could become syllabilized by shifting from semivowel to vowel.
This sound as described by Kuhnert is a high front semivowel, i.
According to the rule, the weak grade vowels i and u (and possibly other syllabic resonants) were lost after a light syllable when preceded by a consonant and followed by a corresponding semivowel and a vowel.
The classification below groups these verbs according to the root vowel and the presence or absence in the preterite of the semivowel [j] in word-initial position (unless indicated otherwise, all forms are singular):