senatorial courtesy


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Related to senatorial courtesy: writ of certiorari

senatorial courtesy

n.
The custom in the US Senate of refusing to confirm a presidential appointment to office opposed by both senators from the state of the appointee or by the senior senator of the president's party.

senato′rial cour′tesy


n.
the practice in the U.S. Senate of confirming only those presidential appointees approved by both senators from the state of the appointee, or by the senior senator of the president's party.
[1880–85, Amer.]
References in periodicals archive ?
We ask that you reconsider your decision to further upend our institutional norms and senatorial courtesy by undoing a century of tradition.
In ordinary times, deference to a president's choice of executive branch officials is appropriate, and practices such as senatorial courtesy are understandable.
The secret hold, also known as a procedural hold, is a senatorial courtesy members can use to anonymously stall a bill they'd rather not see come to the floor.
Most of that power is derived from the concept of senatorial courtesy, a long-held Senate tradition, which promotes deference of one senator to another.
Indeed, the concept of senatorial courtesy goes beyond the confines of the Senate and, at times, represents the courtesy a president extends, or arguably should extend, to senators.
Out of such considerations grew the custom of senatorial courtesy (Chase 1972, 6).
They vary from the creation of military colleges to the federal exclusionary rule, from state regulation of political parties to Hawaiian statehood, from nationalization of fugitive-slave procedures to rejection of the League of Nations, from senatorial courtesy to expansion of the Spanish-American War to the Philippines.
We at the Prospect are as steeped in tradition as anyone else, and we understand the value of senatorial courtesy.
The practice of senatorial courtesy in New Jersey has long been a source of controversy in relation to executive nominations.
Lurking among the factors that previously had discouraged a challenge to the state practice of senatorial courtesy was the doctrine of political questions in its sundry applications.
advice), in the forms of state party patronage and senatorial courtesy, that are absent in the context of Supreme Court nominations, in which consent has been the principal legislative task.
It is true also because the norm of senatorial courtesy in majority-controlled delegations has long been understood to reflect a collaboration on the part of the Senate and the president that is aimed at sustaining the health of party organizations in the states through patronage.