sending


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scend

also send  (sĕnd)Nautical
intr.v. scend·ed, scend·ing, scends also send·ed or send·ing or sends
To heave upward on a wave or swell.
n.
The rising movement of a ship on a wave or swell.

[Probably alteration (influenced by descend or ascend) of send.]

send 1

 (sĕnd)
v. sent (sĕnt), send·ing, sends
v.tr.
1. To cause to be conveyed by an intermediary to a destination: send goods by plane.
2. To dispatch, as by a communications medium: send a message by radio.
3.
a. To direct to go on a mission: sent troops into the Middle East.
b. To require or enable to go: sent her children to college.
c. To direct (a person) to a source of information; refer: sent the student to the reference section of the library.
4.
a. To give off (heat, for example); emit or issue: a stove that sends forth great warmth.
b. To utter or otherwise emit (sound): sent forth a cry of pain.
5. To hit so as to direct or propel with force; drive: The batter sent the ball to left field. The slap on my back sent me staggering.
6. To cause to take place or occur: We will meet whatever vicissitudes fate may send.
7.
a. To put or drive into a given state or condition: horrifying news that sent them into a panic.
b. Slang To transport with delight; carry away: That music really sends me.
v.intr.
1. To dispatch someone to do an errand or convey a message: Let's send out for hamburgers.
2. To dispatch a request or order, especially by mail: send away for a new catalogue.
3. To transmit a message or messages: The radio operator was still sending when the ship went down.
Phrasal Verbs:
send down Chiefly British
To suspend or dismiss from a university.
send for
To request to come by means of a message or messenger; summon.
send in
1. To cause to arrive or to be delivered to the recipient: Let's send in a letter of protest.
2. Sports To put (a player) into or back into a game or contest: The coach is sending in the kicker.
3. To cause (someone) to arrive in or become involved in a particular place or situation: The commander sent in the sappers. It's time to send in the lawyers.
send off
Sports To eject (a player), as from a soccer game, especially for a flagrant violation of the rules.
send up Informal
1. To send to jail: was sent up for 20 years.
2. To make a parody of: "grandiloquently eccentric but witty verbiage ... that would send up the nastiness of suburban London" (New York).
Idioms:
send flying Informal
To cause to be knocked or scattered about with force: a blow to the table that sent the dishes flying.
send packing
To dismiss (someone) abruptly.

[Middle English senden, from Old English sendan; see sent- in Indo-European roots.]

send′er n.
Synonyms: send1, dispatch, forward, route, ship, transmit
These verbs mean to cause to go or be taken to a destination: sent the package by parcel post; dispatched a union representative to the factory; forwards the mail to their new address; routed the soldiers through New York; shipped his books to his dormitory; transmits money by cable.

send 2

 (sĕnd)
v. & n. Nautical
Variant of scend.

sending

  • granulated sugar - So called because the last step in processing white table sugar is sending it through a granulator, where it is dried and formed into tiny grains.
  • mission - First denoted sending the Holy Spirit into the world, from Latin mittere, "send."
  • perennial - First meant "remaining leafy throughout the year"; plants living three or more years—dying aboveground and sending up fresh growth every year—are perennials.
  • radio - An abbreviation of radiotelegraphy, the sending of messages by electromagnetic rays.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.sending - the act of causing something to go (especially messages)sending - the act of causing something to go (especially messages)
causation, causing - the act of causing something to happen
transmission, transmittal, transmitting - the act of sending a message; causing a message to be transmitted
References in classic literature ?
Having dismounted he went up to the Emperor with rapid strides and in a loud voice began boldly demonstrating the necessity of sending reinforcements.
Though there was no advantage in sending Friant's division instead of Claparede's, and even in obvious inconvenience and delay in stopping Claparede and sending Friant now, the order was carried out exactly.
They were polite enough to ask if I could account for Lord Montbarry's writing to me and sending me the money.
These days past, when sending Your Excellency my plays, that had appeared in print before being shown on the stage, I said, if I remember well, that Don Quixote was putting on his spurs to go and render homage to Your Excellency.
The Achaeans are now taking the girl in a ship to Chryse, and sending gifts of sacrifice to the god; but the heralds have just taken from my tent the daughter of Briseus, whom the Achaeans had awarded to myself.
Mahomet, at last satisfied with cruelty, made an offer of sending him to the viceroy of the Indies, if he would turn Mussulman.
The priest was continually sending first the beadle and then the deacon to find out whether the bridegroom had not come, more and more often he went himself, in a lilac vestment and an embroidered sash, to the side door, expecting to see the bridegroom.
So I begged he would notfor really as to ours being gone, I could not absolutely say that we had a great many leftit was but half a dozen indeed; but they should be all kept for Jane; and I could not at all bear that he should be sending us more, so liberal as he had been already; and Jane said the same.
Don't get in the habit of sending out a press release every month or every few weeks.
Yet fees to wire money to Mexico have already been cut in half since the late 1990s through increased competition, and with some banks preparing to erase entirely the costs of sending money for account holders, the future battle--if there is to be one--will most likely be over creating funding streams for community investment in Mexico or in Mexican immigrant communities in the U.
5 percent of Los Angeles' public-school teachers are sending their own children to private schools, versus only 15.
Even while the FCC regulation is in effect, however, there is some doubt about its validity, and ABM members and others regularly face lawsuits for sending faxes to existing customers and subscribers.

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