sense


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sense

 (sĕns)
n.
1.
a. Any of the faculties by which stimuli from outside or inside the body are received and felt, as the faculties of hearing, sight, smell, touch, taste, and equilibrium.
b. A perception or feeling produced by a stimulus; sensation: a sense of fatigue and hunger.
2. senses The faculties of sensation as means of providing physical gratification and pleasure.
3.
a. An intuitive or acquired perception or ability to estimate: a sense of diplomatic timing.
b. A capacity to appreciate or understand: a keen sense of humor.
c. A vague feeling or presentiment: a sense of impending doom.
d. Recognition or perception either through the senses or through the intellect; consciousness: has no sense of shame.
4.
a. Natural understanding or intelligence, especially in practical matters: The boy had sense and knew just what to do when he got lost.
b. often senses The normal ability to think or reason soundly: Have you taken leave of your senses?
c. Something sound or reasonable: There's no sense in waiting three hours.
5.
a. A meaning that is conveyed, as in speech or writing; signification: The sense of the criticism is that the proposal has certain risks.
b. One of the meanings of a word or phrase: The word set has many senses.
6.
a. Judgment; consensus: sounding out the sense of the electorate on capital punishment.
b. Intellectual interpretation, as of the significance of an event or the conclusions reached by a group: I came away from the meeting with the sense that we had resolved all outstanding issues.
tr.v. sensed, sens·ing, sens·es
1. To become aware of; perceive: organisms able to sense their surroundings.
2. To grasp; understand: sensed that the financial situation would improve.
3. To detect automatically: sense radioactivity.
adj.
Genetics Of or relating to the portion of the strand of double-stranded DNA that serves as a template for and is transcribed into RNA.

[Middle English, meaning, from Old French sens, from Latin sēnsus, the faculty of perceiving, from past participle of sentīre, to feel; see sent- in Indo-European roots.]

sense

(sɛns)
n
1. (Physiology) any of the faculties by which the mind receives information about the external world or about the state of the body. In addition to the five traditional faculties of sight, hearing, touch, taste, and smell, the term includes the means by which bodily position, temperature, pain, balance, etc, are perceived
2. (Physiology) such faculties collectively; the ability to perceive
3. (Physiology) a feeling perceived through one of the senses: a sense of warmth.
4. a mental perception or awareness: a sense of happiness.
5. moral discernment; understanding: a sense of right and wrong.
6. (sometimes plural) sound practical judgment or intelligence: he is a man without any sense.
7. reason or purpose: what is the sense of going out in the rain?.
8. substance or gist; meaning: what is the sense of this proverb?.
9. specific meaning; definition: in what sense are you using the word?.
10. an opinion or consensus
11. (Mathematics) maths one of two opposite directions measured on a directed line; the sign as contrasted with the magnitude of a vector
12. (Logic) logic linguistics
a. the import of an expression as contrasted with its referent. Thus the morning star and the evening star have the same reference, Venus, but different senses
b. the property of an expression by virtue of which its referent is determined
c. that which one grasps in understanding an expression
13. (Linguistics) logic linguistics
a. the import of an expression as contrasted with its referent. Thus the morning star and the evening star have the same reference, Venus, but different senses
b. the property of an expression by virtue of which its referent is determined
c. that which one grasps in understanding an expression
14. make sense to be reasonable or understandable
15. take leave of one's senses See leave28
vb (tr)
16. (Physiology) to perceive through one or more of the senses
17. to apprehend or detect without or in advance of the evidence of the senses
18. to understand
19. (Computer Science) computing
a. to test or locate the position of (a part of computer hardware)
b. to read (data)
[C14: from Latin sēnsus, from sentīre to feel]

sense

(sɛns)

n., v. sensed, sens•ing. n.
1. any of the faculties, as sight, hearing, smell, taste, or touch, by which humans and animals perceive stimuli originating from outside or inside the body.
2. these faculties collectively.
3. their operation or function; sensation.
4. a feeling or perception produced through one of the senses: a sense of cold.
5. a faculty or function of the mind analogous to a physical sense: the moral sense.
6. any special capacity for perception, estimation, appreciation, etc.: a sense of humor.
7. Usu., senses. sanity: Have you taken leave of your senses?
8. a more or less vague perception or impression: a sense of security.
9. a mental discernment, realization, or recognition: a sense of value.
10. a motivating awareness: a sense of duty.
11. sound practical intelligence.
12. reasonable thought or discourse: to talk sense.
13. substance or gist; content: You missed the sense of his statement.
14. value; merit: There's no sense in worrying.
15. a DNA sequence that is capable of coding for an amino acid (disting. from nonsense).
16. the meaning of a word or phrase in a specific context, esp. as isolated in a dictionary or glossary.
17. consensus: the sense of a meeting.
v.t.
18. to perceive by the senses; become aware of.
19. to grasp the meaning of; understand.
20. to detect (physical phenomena, as light or temperature) mechanically, electrically, or photoelectrically.
Idioms:
1. in a sense, to some extent; in a way: In a sense, the book was oddly gripping.
2. make sense, to be reasonable or comprehensible.
[1350–1400; Middle English (n.) < Latin sēnsus sensation, feeling, understanding =sent(īre) to feel + -tus suffix of v. action]
syn: See meaning.

Sense

 

See Also: INTELLIGENCE

  1. As reasonable as Latin —Anne Sexton
  2. Beyond rationality … like stepping out into deep space, or going to the center of the world, or both at once —Susan Engberg
  3. Common sense is as rare as genius —Ralph Waldo Emerson

    See Also: RARITY

  4. Human reason is like a drunken man on horseback; set it up on one side, and it tumbles over on the other —Martin Luther
  5. Like precious stones, his sensible remarks derive their value from their scarcity —W. S. Gilbert
  6. Logic, like whisky, loses its beneficial effect when taken in too large quantities —Lord Dunsany
  7. A mind all logic is like a knife all blade. It makes the hand bleed that uses it —Rabindranath Tagore
  8. Reason in man is rather like God in the world —St. Thomas Aquinas
  9. Reason is a bladder on which you may paddle like a child as you swim in summer waters; but, when the winds rise and the waves roughen, it slips from under you, and you sink —Walter Savage Landor
  10. Reason is like the sun, of which the light is constant, uniform, and lasting —Samuel Johnson
  11. Sense, like charity, begins at home —Alexander Pope

    Pope’s Moral Essays can be credited with the first of many “Charity begins at home” comparisons.

    See Also: CHANGE, EDUCATION, PEACEFULNESS, SENSE

  12. Tried to size up the situation reasonably, to tote odds like a paramutual —Jonathan Valin

Sense

 

rhyme or reason Sense, justification, explanation, cause, motivation; reasonableness, reason. The rhyme of the phrase remains as a superfluous alliterative element, providing added emphasis. Apparently it originally referred to amusement or entertainment, since works written in verse were considered aimed toward those ends; the reason of the phrase meant instruction or enlightenment, the supposed province of prose. Today the words usually appear in negative structures or contexts denoting their absence: without rhyme or reason, neither rhyme nor reason, what possible rhyme or reason? The expression was used in this sense of ‘reasonableness’ only as early as 1664 by Henry More:

Against all the laws of prophetic interpretation, nay indeed against all rhyme and reason. (Mystery of Iniquity)

An anecdote frequently recounted about Sir Thomas More, however, indicates that the phrase may have been in common parlance by the 15th century. A budding author, on requesting the learned man’s opinion of a work, was told to convert it to rhyme. Having done so, he submitted it to Sir Thomas’ judgment once again, upon which the scholarly wit devastatingly remarked, “That will do. ’Tis rhyme now, anyway, whereas before ’twas neither rhyme nor reason.”

sense


Past participle: sensed
Gerund: sensing

Imperative
sense
sense
Present
I sense
you sense
he/she/it senses
we sense
you sense
they sense
Preterite
I sensed
you sensed
he/she/it sensed
we sensed
you sensed
they sensed
Present Continuous
I am sensing
you are sensing
he/she/it is sensing
we are sensing
you are sensing
they are sensing
Present Perfect
I have sensed
you have sensed
he/she/it has sensed
we have sensed
you have sensed
they have sensed
Past Continuous
I was sensing
you were sensing
he/she/it was sensing
we were sensing
you were sensing
they were sensing
Past Perfect
I had sensed
you had sensed
he/she/it had sensed
we had sensed
you had sensed
they had sensed
Future
I will sense
you will sense
he/she/it will sense
we will sense
you will sense
they will sense
Future Perfect
I will have sensed
you will have sensed
he/she/it will have sensed
we will have sensed
you will have sensed
they will have sensed
Future Continuous
I will be sensing
you will be sensing
he/she/it will be sensing
we will be sensing
you will be sensing
they will be sensing
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been sensing
you have been sensing
he/she/it has been sensing
we have been sensing
you have been sensing
they have been sensing
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been sensing
you will have been sensing
he/she/it will have been sensing
we will have been sensing
you will have been sensing
they will have been sensing
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been sensing
you had been sensing
he/she/it had been sensing
we had been sensing
you had been sensing
they had been sensing
Conditional
I would sense
you would sense
he/she/it would sense
we would sense
you would sense
they would sense
Past Conditional
I would have sensed
you would have sensed
he/she/it would have sensed
we would have sensed
you would have sensed
they would have sensed
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.sense - a general conscious awareness; "a sense of security"; "a sense of happiness"; "a sense of danger"; "a sense of self"
awareness, cognisance, cognizance, knowingness, consciousness - having knowledge of; "he had no awareness of his mistakes"; "his sudden consciousness of the problem he faced"; "their intelligence and general knowingness was impressive"
sense of direction - an awareness of your orientation in space
sense of responsibility - an awareness of your obligations
2.sense - the meaning of a word or expression; the way in which a word or expression or situation can be interpreted; "the dictionary gave several senses for the word"; "in the best sense charity is really a duty"; "the signifier is linked to the signified"
meaning, signification, import, significance - the message that is intended or expressed or signified; "what is the meaning of this sentence"; "the significance of a red traffic light"; "the signification of Chinese characters"; "the import of his announcement was ambiguous"
word meaning, word sense, acceptation - the accepted meaning of a word
3.sense - the faculty through which the external world is apprehended; "in the dark he had to depend on touch and on his senses of smell and hearing"
faculty, mental faculty, module - one of the inherent cognitive or perceptual powers of the mind
sense modality, sensory system, modality - a particular sense
sensitivity, sensitiveness, sensibility - (physiology) responsiveness to external stimuli; the faculty of sensation; "sensitivity to pain"
4.sense - sound practical judgment; "Common sense is not so common"; "he hasn't got the sense God gave little green apples"; "fortunately she had the good sense to run away"
sagaciousness, sagacity, discernment, judgement, judgment - the mental ability to understand and discriminate between relations
logic - reasoned and reasonable judgment; "it made a certain kind of logic"
nous - common sense; "she has great social nous"
road sense - good judgment in avoiding trouble or accidents on the road
5.sense - a natural appreciation or ability; "a keen musical sense"; "a good sense of timing"
appreciation, grasp, hold - understanding of the nature or meaning or quality or magnitude of something; "he has a good grasp of accounting practices"
Verb1.sense - perceive by a physical sensation, e.g., coming from the skin or muscles; "He felt the wind"; "She felt an object brushing her arm"; "He felt his flesh crawl"; "She felt the heat when she got out of the car"
perceive, comprehend - to become aware of through the senses; "I could perceive the ship coming over the horizon"
feel - be felt or perceived in a certain way; "The ground feels shaky"; "The sheets feel soft"
2.sense - detect some circumstance or entity automatically; "This robot can sense the presence of people in the room"; "particle detectors sense ionization"
detect, discover, notice, observe, find - discover or determine the existence, presence, or fact of; "She detected high levels of lead in her drinking water"; "We found traces of lead in the paint"
3.sense - become aware of not through the senses but instinctively; "I sense his hostility"; "i smell trouble"; "smell out corruption"
perceive - become conscious of; "She finally perceived the futility of her protest"
4.sense - comprehend; "I sensed the real meaning of his letter"
understand - know and comprehend the nature or meaning of; "She did not understand her husband"; "I understand what she means"

sense

noun
1. faculty, perception, sensation, feeling, sensibility a keen sense of smell
2. feeling, impression, perception, awareness, consciousness, atmosphere, aura, intuition, premonition, presentiment There is no sense of urgency on either side.
3. understanding, awareness, appreciation, comprehension, discernment He has an impeccable sense of timing.
4. (sometimes plural) intelligence, reason, understanding, brains (informal), smarts (slang, chiefly U.S.), judgment, discrimination, wisdom, wit(s), common sense, sanity, sharpness, tact, nous (Brit. slang), cleverness, quickness, discernment, gumption (Brit. informal), sagacity, clear-headedness, mother wit When he was younger he had a bit more sense.
intelligence stupidity, foolishness, silliness, idiocy, folly
5. point, good, use, reason, value, benefit, worth, advantage, purpose, logic There's no sense in pretending this doesn't happen.
verb
1. perceive, feel, understand, notice, pick up, suspect, realize, observe, appreciate, grasp, be aware of, divine, discern, just know, have a (funny) feeling (informal), get the impression, apprehend, have a hunch He had sensed what might happen.
perceive miss, overlook, misunderstand, be unaware of, fail to grasp or notice
come to your senses realize, understand, wake up, catch on (informal), become aware Then she came to her senses. She had almost betrayed herself.
make sense be clear, be understood, come together, have meaning It all makes sense now.
make sense of understand, appreciate, comprehend, get to the bottom of, get your head round This is to help her make sense of past experiences.

sense

noun
1. The capacity for or an act of responding to a stimulus:
2. The condition of being aware:
3. The faculty of thinking, reasoning, and acquiring and applying knowledge:
Slang: smart (used in plural).
4. The ability to make sensible decisions:
Informal: gumption, horse sense.
5. A healthy mental state.Often used in plural:
Slang: marble (used in plural).
6. What is sound or reasonable:
Idiom: rhyme or reason.
7. That which is signified by a word or expression:
verb
1. To be intuitively aware of:
Idioms: feel in one's bones, get vibrations.
2. To view in a certain way:
3. To perceive and recognize the meaning of:
Informal: savvy.
Slang: dig.
Chiefly British: twig.
Scots: ken.
Translations
إحْساسحاسَّةحاسَّهشُعورمَعْنى
sentitsignificat
smyslvýkladvýznamvýzvacit
sansdømmekraftfølelsefornemmefornemmelse
aistiaistiamerkitystunto
čulosmisao
értelemérzés
dómgreindmerkingmerking, òÿîingskyn, -gáfaskyn, skilningarvit
感覚気づくセンス分別察する
감각
nesuvokiantnesuvokimasšeštasis pojūtissveika nuovoka
apziņaapzinātiesbūtībaizjūtajēga
dobrý vkus
občutekpomensmiselzaznatirazum
sinnebemärkelsebetydelsemening
ความรู้สึก
giác quan

sense

[sens]
A. N
1. (bodily) → sentido m
sense of hearing/smell/taste/touchsentido m del oído/olfato/gusto/tacto
sense of sightsentido m de la vista
to have a keen sense of smelltener un (sentido del) olfato muy agudo
sixth sensesexto sentido
2. (= feeling) → sensación f
I was overcome by a sense of failureme invadió una sensación de fracaso
I felt a terrible sense of guiltme invadió un tremendo sentimiento de culpa or culpabilidad
I felt a terrible sense of losssentí un tremendo vacío
have you no sense of shame?¿es que no tienes vergüenza?
there is a sense of space in his paintingssus cuadros transmiten una sensación de espacio
I lost all sense of timeperdí la noción del tiempo
3. (= good judgement) → sentido m común
she has more sense than to go out on her owntiene el suficiente sentido común como para no salir sola
I thought you would have had more sensepensé que eras más sensato or tenías más sentido común
he has more money than sensele sobra dinero pero le falta sentido común
he had the sense to call the doctortuvo bastante sentido común como para llamar al médico
to make sb see sensehacer que algn entre en razón
to talk sensehablar con sentido común, hablar con juicio
4.
to make sense (= be advisable) → ser conveniente; (= be comprehensible, logical) → tener sentido
it makes sense to eat a balanced dietes conveniente llevar una dieta equilibrada
it makes sense to mea mí me parece lógico
it doesn't make sense or it makes no senseno tiene sentido
to make sense of sth I could make no sense of what he was sayingno entendía nada de lo que decía, no podía sacar nada en claro de lo que decía
5. (= point, use) → sentido m
what's the sense of having another meeting?¿qué sentido tiene celebrar otra reunión?
there's no sense in making people unhappyno tiene sentido disgustar a la gente
6. senses (= sanity)
I hope this warning will bring him to his sensesespero que esta advertencia le haga entrar en razón
to come to one's sensesentrar en razón
no-one in his right senses would do thatnadie (que esté) en su sano juicio haría eso
have you taken leave of your senses?¿has perdido el juicio?
7. (= meaning) (gen) → sentido m; (in dictionary) → acepción f, significado m
it has several sensestiene varias acepciones or varios significados
in what sense are you using the word?¿qué significado le das a la palabra?
in a senseen cierto modo
in every sense (of the word)en todos los sentidos (de la palabra)
in the full sense of that worden toda la extensión de la palabra
in no sense can it be said thatde ninguna manera se puede decir que ...
in one senseen cierto modo
in the strict/true sense of the worden el sentido estricto/en el verdadero sentido de la palabra
8. (= awareness) → sentido m
she has very good business sensetiene muy buen ojo para los negocios
sense of directionsentido m de la orientación
she has a strong sense of dutytiene un arraigado sentido del deber
sense of humoursentido m del humor
they have an exaggerated sense of their own importancese creen bastante más importantes de lo que son
where's your sense of occasion?tienes que estar a la altura de las circunstancias or la ocasión
we must keep a sense of proportion about thisno debemos darle a esto más importancia de la que tiene
one must have some sense of right and wronguno tiene que tener cierta noción de lo que está bien y lo que está mal
sense of self(señas fpl de) identidad f
he has no sense of timinges de lo más inoportuno
she needs to regain a sense of her own worthnecesita recuperar la confianza en sí misma
9. (= opinion) → opinión f
what is your sense of the mood of the electorate?¿qué opinión le merece el clima que se respira entre el electorado?
B. VT
1. (= suspect, intuit) → presentir
he looked about him, sensing dangermiró a su alrededor, presintiendo peligro
to sense thatnotar que
he sensed that he wasn't wantednotó que estaba de más
2. (= be conscious of) → percibir
the horse can sense your fearel caballo percibe si tienes miedo
3. (= realize) → darse cuenta de
C. CPD sense organ Nórgano m sensorial

sense

[ˈsɛns]
n
(= ability to perceive) → sens m
the five senses → les cinq sens
the sense of touch → le toucher, le sens du toucher
the sense of smell → l'odorat, le sens de l'odorat
These dogs have an excellent sense of smell → Ces chiens ont un excellent odorat., Ces chiens ont un excellent sens de l'odorat.
a sixth sense → un sixième sens
(= feeling) → sentiment m
I was overcome by a sense of failure → J'étais accablé par un sentiment d'échec.
to have a sense that ... → avoir le sentiment que ...
to get the sense that ... → avoir le sentiment que ...
(= reason) → bon sens m
Have some sense! → Un peu de bon sens, voyons!
Your friends have more money than sense → Tes amis ont plus d'argent que de bon sens.
to talk sense → dire des choses sensées
there is no sense in doing sth → cela n'a pas de sens de faire qch
There's no sense in making people unhappy → Cela n'a pas de sens de rendre les gens malheureux.
(= meaning) → sens m
in its literal sense
I was using the word in its literal sense → J'utilisais le mot au sens littéral.
in every sense of the word → dans tous les sens du terme
(= way, aspect) in a sense → dans un sens
In a sense, we were both right
in one sense → en un sens
In one sense, I think this is true → En un sens, je pense que c'est vrai.
in some senses → en un certain sens
in any sense → en aucune façon
it makes sense (= has meaning) → cela se comprend
Read this and tell me if it makes sense → Lis ça et dis-moi si ça se comprend.
It all makes sense now → On comprend tout maintenant. (= is reasonable) → c'est tout à fait sensé
The project makes sound economic sense → Le projet est tout à fait sensé d'un point de vue économique.
it makes no sense, it doesn't make sense → cela n'a pas de sens
it makes sense to do sth → il est judicieux de faire qch
it makes no sense to do sth → cela n'a pas de sens de faire qch
to make sense of sth (= understand) → comprendre qch
vtsentir
I sensed her annoyance → Je sentis son irritation.
I sensed a change in his attitude → J'ai senti un changement dans son attitude.
to sense (that) ... → sentir que ...
I sensed that he did not want to talk to me → J'ai senti qu'il ne voulait pas me parler.
He immediately sensed something was wrong → Il sentit immédiatement que quelque chose n'allait pas. senses
nplsens mpl
to come to one's senses (= regain consciousness) → reprendre ses sens (= become reasonable) → revenir à la raison
to take leave of one's senses → perdre la tête

sense

n
(bodily) → Sinn m; sense of hearingGehörsinn m, → Gehör nt; sense of sightSehvermögen nt; sense of smellGeruchssinn m; sense of tasteGeschmack(sinn) m; sense of touchTastsinn m
senses pl (= right mind)Verstand m; no man in his senses …kein einigermaßen vernünftiger Mensch; to frighten somebody out of his sensesjdn zu Tode erschrecken; his senses were deranged by …er war durch … völlig verstört; to bring somebody to his sensesjdn zur Vernunft or Besinnung bringen; to come to one’s senseszur Vernunft or Besinnung kommen, Vernunft annehmen
(= feeling)Gefühl nt; sense of dutyPflichtbewusstsein or -gefühl nt; sense of guiltSchuldgefühl nt; a sense of pleasure etcein Gefühl der Freude etc; a sense of occasiondas Gefühl, dass etwas Besonderes stattfindet; he has an exaggerated sense of his own importanceer nimmt sich selbst übertrieben wichtig; imbued with a sense of historyvon Geschichte durchtränkt (liter); there’s a sense of insecurity in the countryim Land herrscht ein Gefühl der Unsicherheit; a false sense of securityein falsches Gefühl der Sicherheit; these buildings create a sense of spacediese Gebäude vermitteln den Eindruck von Weite
(= instinct, appreciation)Sinn m; his sense for what is appropriatesein Gefühl ntor Gespür ntdafür, was angebracht ist; sense of colour (Brit) or color (US) /justiceFarben-/Gerechtigkeitssinn m
(= good sense) (common) sensegesunder Menschenverstand; haven’t you sense enough or enough sense to stop when you’re tired?bist du nicht vernünftig genug aufzuhören, wenn du müde bist?; he had the (good) sense to …er war so vernünftig or klug or gescheit und …; you should have had more sense than to …du hättest vernünftiger sein sollen und nicht; there is no sense in thatdas hat keinen Sinn, es ist zwecklos; there’s a lot of sense in thatdas hat Hand und Fuß, das ist ganz vernünftig; what’s the sense of or in doing this?welchen Sinn hat es denn, das zu tun?; there is no sense in doing thates ist zwecklos or sinnlos, das zu tun; there is no sense in cryinges hat keinen Sinn zu heulen; there’s some sense in what he sayswas er sagt, ist ganz vernünftig; there’s some sense in doing thates wäre ganz vernünftig, das zu tun; to be full of good sensegrundvernünftig sein; to talk sensevernünftig sein; you’re just not talking sensedu bist doch völlig unvernünftig; now you’re talking sensedas lässt sich schon eher hören; he hasn’t the sense he was born wither hat nicht für fünf Cent Verstand (inf); to make somebody see sensejdn zur Vernunft bringen
to make sense (sentence etc) → (einen) Sinn ergeben; (= be sensible, rational etc)sinnvoll or vernünftig sein, Sinn machen; it doesn’t make sense doing it that way/spending or to spend all that moneyes ist doch Unsinn or unvernünftig, es so zu machen/so viel Geld auszugeben; why did he decide that? — I don’t know, it doesn’t make sensewarum hat er das beschlossen? — ich weiß es nicht, es ist mir unverständlich or es macht keinen Sinn; the whole thing fails to make sense to medie ganze Sache leuchtet mir nicht ein; it makes good or sound sensedas scheint sehr vernünftig; it makes good financial/political sense to …aus finanzieller/politischer Sicht gesehen ist es sehr vernünftig, zu …; sometimes life just doesn’t make sensemanchmal ergibt das Leben einfach keinen Sinn; her conduct doesn’t make sense to meich werde aus ihrem Verhalten nicht schlau (inf); he/his theory doesn’t make senseer/seine Theorie ist völlig unverständlich; it all makes sense nowjetzt wird einem alles klar; it doesn’t make sense, the jewels were there a minute agodas ist ganz unverständlich, die Juwelen waren doch eben noch da; to make sense of somethingetw verstehen, aus etw schlau werden (inf); you’re not making sense (in explaining sth, in plans, intentions etc) → das ist doch Unsinn; (in behaviour, attitude) → ich werde aus Ihnen nicht schlau (inf); now you’re making sense (in explaining sth) → jetzt verstehe ich, was Sie meinen; (in plans, intentions etc) → das ist endlich eine vernünftige Idee
(= meaning)Sinn m no pl; in the full or true sense of the wordim wahrsten Sinn des Wortes; it has three distinct senseses hat drei verschiedene Bedeutungen; in what sense are you using the word?in welchem Sinn or welcher Bedeutung gebrauchen Sie das Wort?; he is an amateur in the best senseer ist Amateur im eigentlichen Sinn des Wortes; in every sense of the wordin der vollen Bedeutung des Wortes; in the usual sense of the wordim herkömmlichen Sinne des Wortes
(= way, respect) in a sensein gewisser Hinsicht, gewissermaßen; in every sensein jeder Hinsicht; in what sense?inwiefern?; in one sense what he claims is truein gewisser Hinsicht hat er mit seiner Behauptung recht
vtfühlen, spüren; I could sense someone there in the darkich fühlte or spürte, dass da jemand in der Dunkelheit war

sense

:
sense datum
nSinnesdatum nt
sense group
n (Ling) → Sinngruppe f; (Comput Ling: in SGML- or XML-text) → Bedeutungsgruppe f

sense

[sɛns]
1. n
a. (faculty) → senso
a keen sense of smell/hearing → un olfatto/udito fine
to come to one's senses (regain consciousness) → riprendere i sensi
sixth sense → sesto senso
senso of direction → senso di orientamento
to lose all sense of time → perdere la nozione del tempo
sense of humour → (senso dell') umorismo
b. (feeling) → senso, sensazione f
sense of duty/guilt → senso del dovere/di colpa
a sense of well-being → una sensazione di benessere
c. (also common sense) → buonsenso
he should have had more sense than to do it → avrebbe dovuto avere il buonsenso di non farlo
there is no sense in (doing) that → non ha senso (farlo)
she had the sense to call the doctor → ha avuto il buonsenso di chiamare il medico
to make sb see sense → far ragionare qn, far intendere ragione a qn
d. (sanity) senses nplragione fsg, senno msg
to come to one's senses (become reasonable) → tornare in sé
to bring sb to his senses → riportare qn alla ragione, far rinsavire qn
to take leave of one's senses → perdere il lume or l'uso della ragione
e. (meaning) → senso, significato
it makes sense → ha senso
it doesn't make sense → non ha senso
I can't make (any) sense of this → non ci capisco niente
in one or a sense → in un certo senso
in every sense (of the word) → in tutti i sensi (del termine)
f. (Math) → verso
2. vt (presence, interest) → avvertire, intuire; (danger) → sentire, percepire
to sense that all is not well → sentire che c'è qualcosa che non va

sense

(sens) noun
1. one of the five powers (hearing, taste, sight, smell, touch) by which a person or animal feels or notices.
2. a feeling. He has an exaggerated sense of his own importance.
3. an awareness of (something). a well-developed musical sense; She has no sense of humour.
4. good judgement. You can rely on him – he has plenty of sense.
5. a meaning (of a word).
6. something which is meaningful. Can you make sense of her letter?
verb
to feel, become aware of, or realize. He sensed that she disapproved.
ˈsenseless adjective
1. stunned or unconscious. The blow knocked him senseless.
2. foolish. What a senseless thing to do!
ˈsenselessly adverb
ˈsenselessness noun
ˈsenses noun plural
(usually with my, ~his, ~her etc) a person's normal, sane state of mind. He must have taken leave of his senses; When he came to his senses, he was lying in a hospital bed.
sixth sense
an ability to feel or realize something apparently not by means of any of the five senses. He couldn't hear or see anyone, but a sixth sense told him that he was being followed.

sense

حاسَّة smysl sans Sinn αίσθηση sentido aisti sens čulo senso 感覚 감각 zintuig fornuft zmysł sentido чувство sinne ความรู้สึก duyu giác quan 感觉

sense

n. sentido, facultad de percibir por medio de los órganos sensoriales;
common ______ común;
___ of hearing___ del oído;
___ of humor___ del humor;
___ of sight___ de la vista;
___ of smell___ del olfato;
___ of taste___ del gusto;
___ of touch___ del tacto;
v. sentir.

sense

n sentido; — of balance sentido de(l) equilibrio; — of hearing sentido del oído or de la audición; — of humor sentido del humor; — of sight sentido de la vista; — of smell sentido del olfato; — of taste sentido del gusto; — of touch sentido del tacto
References in classic literature ?
Poor Meg seldom complained, but a sense of injustice made her feel bitter toward everyone sometimes, for she had not yet learned to know how rich she was in the blessings which alone can make life happy.
Yo'--yo' giant yo'--yo' may be strong laik a bull, but ya' ain't got as much sense as mah mule, Boomerang
She would, through habit, have yielded to his desire; not with any sense of submission or obedience to his compelling wishes, but unthinkingly, as we walk, move, sit, stand, go through the daily treadmill of the life which has been portioned out to us.
You will diminish them, indeed," returned the arch girl; "for never did I hear a more unworthy conjunction of execution and language than that to which I have been listening; and I was far gone in a learned inquiry into the causes of such an unfitness between sound and sense, when you broke the charm of my musings by that bass of yours, Duncan
It would have been impossible to carry a bad name with a greater sweetness of innocence, and by the time I had got back to Bly with him I remained merely bewildered--so far, that is, as I was not outraged-- by the sense of the horrible letter locked up in my room, in a drawer.
I never hear better sense from any one than Robert Martin.
In the course of their conversation they fell to discussing what they call State-craft and systems of government, correcting this abuse and condemning that, reforming one practice and abolishing another, each of the three setting up for a new legislator, a modern Lycurgus, or a brand-new Solon; and so completely did they remodel the State, that they seemed to have thrust it into a furnace and taken out something quite different from what they had put in; and on all the subjects they dealt with, Don Quixote spoke with such good sense that the pair of examiners were fully convinced that he was quite recovered and in his full senses.
The truth of this is sufficiently manifest from the single circumstance, that the philosophers of the schools accept as a maxim that there is nothing in the understanding which was not previously in the senses, in which however it is certain that the ideas of God and of the soul have never been; and it appears to me that they who make use of their imagination to comprehend these ideas do exactly the some thing as if, in order to hear sounds or smell odors, they strove to avail themselves of their eyes; unless indeed that there is this difference, that the sense of sight does not afford us an inferior assurance to those of smell or hearing; in place of which, neither our imagination nor our senses can give us assurance of anything unless our understanding intervene.
ALTHOUGH I am of opinion that there would be no real danger of the consequences which seem to be apprehended to the State governments from a power in the Union to control them in the levies of money, because I am persuaded that the sense of the people, the extreme hazard of provoking the resentments of the State governments, and a conviction of the utility and necessity of local administrations for local purposes, would be a complete barrier against the oppressive use of such a power; yet I am willing here to allow, in its full extent, the justness of the reasoning which requires that the individual States should possess an independent and uncontrollable authority to raise their own revenues for the supply of their own wants.
The first means of recognition is the sense of hearing; which with us is far more highly developed than with you, and which enables us not only to distinguish by the voice our personal friends, but even to discriminate between different classes, at least so far as concerns the three lowest orders, the Equilateral, the Square, and the Pentagon -- for of the Isosceles I take no account.
There was not a soul in Randolph Crescent, nor a soul in Queensferry Street; in this outdoor privacy and the sense of escape, John took heart again; and with a pathetic sense of leave-taking, he even ventured up the lane and stood awhile, a strange peri at the gates of a quaint paradise, by the west end of St.
For should any one define in what sense each is an animal, his definition in the one case will be appropriate to that case only.