sense perception


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sense perception

n.
Perception by or based on stimulation of the senses.

sense′ percep`tion


n.
perception by one or more of the senses rather than by the intellect.
[1865–70]
References in classic literature ?
He and the lions had been making so much noise that neither could hear anything above their concerted bedlam, and so it was that Tarzan did not hear the great bulk bearing down upon him from behind until an instant before it was upon him, and then he turned to see Buto, the rhinoceros, his little, pig eyes blazing, charging madly toward him and already so close that escape seemed impossible; yet so perfectly were mind and muscles coordinated in this unspoiled, primitive man that almost simultaneously with the sense perception of the threatened danger he wheeled and hurled his spear at Buto's chest.
He might believe that he was stalking a man-- he did not know, however, that it was a man with the delicate sense perception of the lower orders.
All knowledge is derived originally from sense perception.
Intelletto here becomes a kind of internal estimation or judgment immediately exercised on information obtained through sense perception -- or a faculty, as David Summers has suggested, akin to the giudizio dell'occhio extolled by later Renaissance writers on art.
It is this issue of second-order justification that Alston tackles in The Reliability of Sense Perception.
In fact, according to a recent survey, 7 percent of Americans are said to have Common Sense Perception, or CSP -- an uncanny and uncommon level of common sense.
Just as one's conception of the visible world is founded in reason as informed by sense perception, why cannot one's moral notions appear to reason itself as that which is shaped or informed by one's situation and one's nature, one's vital needs and one's capacity to respond to those needs through the invention and refinement of ethical notions?
Taking her cue from the philosopher Jacques Ranciere, who links politics and aesthetics through sense perception, David proposes an anthropological development of the aesthetic, whereby art becomes indistinguishable from politics and media.
Still, religious world views accomplish something secular world-views do not: by affirming a picture of sacred realities that can be compared, contrasted, and interrelated with that which is merely given in ordinary experience, they assert that sense perception and imagination do not give us the whole truth about existence, that "this isn't all there is.
Though there is, of course, an alternative verbalizing tradition that fixed precisely upon the mediations of artistic technique, typically either as a means of praising the artist or else as a metaphor for the unreliable nature of sense perception.
In the analogous case of sense perception, a survey of attempts to establish its reliability leads him to conclude that those which do not fail for other reasons suffer from the kind of epistemic circularity that involves using sense perception as a source of premises in an argument for the reliability of sense perception.
Parmenides, therefore, argued the opposite view: Rather than identifying reality with change or becoming and the stability of being with semblance or illusion, he referred all change to the problems inherent in sense perception and identified reality as changeless existence.