senseful

senseful

(ˈsɛnsfʊl)
adj
1. literary full of sense; containing meaning or significance
2. archaic full of (common) sense; sensible; intelligent
References in periodicals archive ?
Its content is the unique life of the soul and the body in all their manifestations, and its free-form verse without any "laws" but the requirement of human breath and the senseful pause.
Finkel, Commonsense Justice, Psychology, and the Law: Prototypes that Are Common, Senseful, and Not, 3 PSYCHOL.
In the author's view, Wittgenstein derives the simplicity of objects directly from his account of possible states, complex objects and senseful propositions.
Finkel, Commonsense Justice, Psychology, and the Law: Prototypes Common, Senseful, and Not, 3 PSYCHOL.
employed in the construction of senseful propositions.
To recognize the sign 'drinks' as the verb 'drinks' (and not the plural common noun 'drinks') in 'The table drinks the square root of three' is to recognize the latter as a senseful proposition.
It means that the functions of the four types of moves bringing pieces into the path explain the senseful structure of mental spaces in protocols.
This means that senseful transfer moves do not have much freedom on a board, because the key piece(s) must be transferred to the key squares along a safe path.
The pawn chain, the fields of threat of the pieces, and the location of the target greatly constrain the attacker's senseful moves.
There are constraints which explain why the moves make sense or why they are senseful or 'meaningful'.
Moves are senseful only if they are designed to parry or to aid some operation and hence fulfil the functional constraints for relevant moves.
What is most frustrating in writing such a response is that the etiquette of academic exchanges requires that I treat these texts--which fall apart under the pressures of their own immanent contradictions--as if they were coherent and senseful arguments.