sentence adverb


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Related to sentence adverb: subordinating conjunction

sentence adverb

n.
An adverb or adverbial phrase that modifies an entire sentence, especially in establishing the attitude of the speaker or writer, as thankfully in Thankfully, there was enough for everyone.

sen′tence ad`verb



n.
an adverb modifying or commenting upon the content of a sentence as a whole or upon the conditions under which it is uttered, as frankly in Frankly, he can't be trusted.
[1890–95]
References in periodicals archive ?
33b,b') where the comma tries to capture in the writing the fact that the sentence adverb is de-accented).
Actually, submodifier is an entry in the book, as is sentence adverb, a label that other dictionaries would do well to consider.
The books give similar advice at disinterested, as they do at the fading feminine ending -ess, and their notes about the use of hopefully as a sentence adverb supplement each other.
Consider the following sentences from German (the sentence adverb is put in italics):
They must scramble to the left of the sentence adverb to be destressed and get the required anaphoric reading.
In (40) the assumed licensing requirement of the AF-feature is disrespected, as the direct object stays to the right of the sentence adverb, that is in situ, according to our assumptions.
The tacit premise for this analysis has been twofold: (a) an assumed basic sisterhood relation between argument and verb for the purposes of case and theta marking, credited mostly to Chomsky (1965), but in its essence going back at least to the Port Royal Grammarians, and (b) an idea of Pollock (1989) that sentence adverbs have a fixed attachment site (in [1a] and [1b] the maximal projection of V) in the sentence structure.
The sentence adverb is much more concise than the construction that it replaced.
Some people object to the use of the word hopefully as a sentence adverb, presumably because they think that hopefully is dangling.
Curiously, the people who object to the use of hopefully as a sentence adverb don't seem to object to the use of any other sentence adverbs, such as obviously, curiously, evidently, and thankfully.
Some people feel that it is better to say "one hopes that" instead of using hopefully as a sentence adverb.
Most of these cases drop out of use in Modem English but some survive in literary styles (never prince was more condescending), or get reanalysed as instances of sentence adverbs and noun phrases (Jacobsson 1951: 40-47).