sentence stress


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sentence stress

Sentence stress (also called prosodic stress) refers to the emphasis placed on certain words within a sentence. This varying emphasis gives English a cadence, resulting in a natural songlike quality when spoken fluently.
Sentence stress is generally determined by whether a word is considered a “content word” or a “function word,” and the vocal space between stressed words creates the rhythm of a sentence.
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sentence stress

n.
The variation in emphasis or vocal stress on the syllables of words within a sentence.

sentence stress

n
(Linguistics) the stress given to a word or words in a sentence, often conveying nuances of meaning or emphasis

sen′tence stress`


n.
the pattern of stress given to words arranged in a sentence, often serving to express emphasis, attitude, etc.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.sentence stress - the distribution of stresses within a sentence
stress, accent, emphasis - the relative prominence of a syllable or musical note (especially with regard to stress or pitch); "he put the stress on the wrong syllable"
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Even though this study was mostly based on the misdecoding of segments, word stress and sentence stress played an important role in mishearing, not only the distribution of stress patterns, but the effect of these on the segments in question.
More specifically, primary sentence stress (Hahn, 2004), word stress (Field, 2005; Zielinski, 2008) and speaking rate (Munro & Derwing, 2001) affect intelligibility.
The suprasegmental features of intonation and sentence stress were most frequent (290 and 256 occurrences, respectively), with word stress (218), rhythm (182), and reductions (lexical variants such as hafta and gonna) (152) being the other most frequently covered prosodic features.
Focus has two aspects: the contextual, which indicates which part of the sentence is new and which is known from the context, and its intrasentential manifestation by means of sentence stress placement and word order.
The sentence stress may appear in two forms: the normal/neutral/nonemphatic and the emphatic.
What Szwedek's rule really tells us is that since a speaker does not intend to use any "new" noun in sentence (1), but rather wants to make the verb "new", which is a special situation, he places a sentence stress on the verb.
This sort of explanation of the placement of sentence stress on reading in (1) (Szwedek's (1986)) would, from a generative perspective, merely be "descriptively adequate" in the classical three-grade measure of the adequacy of grammars.
Some examples of macro-skills include notetaking, lecture organization, and key ideas; some micro-skills included in the textbook are sentence stress and word families.
If it were only a formal decision, having nothing to do with semantics or pragmatics, then the choice of position of the sentence stress would be totally arbitrary.
Tajsner paraphrases what I allegedly wrote in the following way: "Why is the sentence stress on reading in (1)?
All attested tokens ending in -lich(e) are placed in a sentence stressed position (10a), whereas, with the exception of but a few examples, the attested -ly forms do not assume a sentence stress (10b).
the object must have a status of "given" information: in Polish the relevant signals are: demonstrative pronoun preceding the noun, sentence initial position of the noun, absence of sentence stress on the noun (cf.