sententia


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sen·ten·tia

 (sĕn-tĕn′shə, -shē-ə)
n. pl. sen·ten·ti·ae (-shē-ē′)
An adage or aphorism.

[Latin; see sentence.]

sententia

(sɛnˈtɛnʃɪə)
n
an opinion, idea, thought, or aphorism, whether written or spoken; a maxim or proverb
References in periodicals archive ?
47, Sententia libri Ethicorum (Rome: Sancta Sabina, 1969).
Husband Tim had expressed surprise that she had never tried to write fiction, prompting the genesis of what is now called The Sententia Series.
A new collection of his poetry, The Weaklings, will be released this fall by Sententia Books.
versibus impariter iunctis querimonia primum, post etiam inclusa est voti sententia compos; quis tamen exiguos elegos emiserit auctor, grammatici certant et adhuc sub iudice lis est.
In the unsparing light of Lightning Rods, the contemporary novel of psychological realism stands revealed as a patchwork of readymade materials--cliches and slogans, the hoariest sententia and newly-minted banalities made "original" by the unspoken complicity of all parties involved to find each particular identikit combination worthy of suitably breathless blurbs.
This is well in accord with the principle that the court can correct a defective sententia legis.
Thomas Aquinas, Sententia libri metapbysicae, book 1, lectio 1, http://www.
The sententia goes awry: the Gallic rooster dies and the anthropomorphized revolution suffers a stroke; concrete entities such as fat peasants and boilers are mixed with idealistic notions such as "revolution" and "Gallic rooster.
cols 150-51); De grandine et tonitruis VIII: "ecce in hac magna et prolixa Ecclesiastici libri sententia, cum subtilissima admiratione imperio Dei tribuitur quidquid in aere fit, quidquid de aere in terram descendit.
although generally considered to be Cicero himself, (82) is not in fact presenting Cicero's own sententia but merely "what was most similar to the truth," i.
The term gnwimwn is listed by Mason (1974:32) as the Greek for a legal formula, so qpignwimwn would refer to a legal assessor, while gnwisi~ could refer to the ratio or sententia of the judge.
The primacy of Cicero's sententia has previous y been acknowledged.