sentient


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Related to sentient: Sentient being

sen·tient

 (sĕn′shənt, -shē-ənt, -tē-ənt)
adj.
1. Having sense perception; conscious: "The living knew themselves just sentient puppets on God's stage" (T.E. Lawrence).
2. Experiencing sensation or feeling.

[Latin sentiēns, sentient-, present participle of sentīre, to feel; see sent- in Indo-European roots.]

sen′tient·ly adv.

sentient

(ˈsɛntɪənt)
adj
having the power of sense perception or sensation; conscious
n
rare a sentient person or thing
[C17: from Latin sentiēns feeling, from sentīre to perceive]
ˈsentiently adv

sen•tient

(ˈsɛn ʃənt)

adj.
1. having the power of perception by the senses; conscious.
2. characterized by sensation and consciousness.
[1595–1605; < Latin sentient-, s. of sentiēns, present participle of sentīre to feel; see -ent]
sen′tient•ly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.sentient - endowed with feeling and unstructured consciousnesssentient - endowed with feeling and unstructured consciousness; "the living knew themselves just sentient puppets on God's stage"- T.E.Lawrence
insensate, insentient - devoid of feeling and consciousness and animation; "insentient (or insensate) stone"
2.sentient - consciously perceiving; "sentient of the intolerable load"; "a boy so sentient of his surroundings"- W.A.White
conscious - knowing and perceiving; having awareness of surroundings and sensations and thoughts; "remained conscious during the operation"; "conscious of his faults"; "became conscious that he was being followed"

sentient

adjective feeling, living, conscious, live, sensitive, reactive sentient creatures, human and nonhuman alike

sentient

adjective
1. Marked by comprehension, cognizance, and perception:
Slang: hip.
Idiom: on to.
2. Able to receive and respond to external stimuli:
Translations

sentient

[ˈsenʃənt] ADJsensitivo, sensible

sentient

[ˈsɛntiənt] adj [being, creature] → doué(e) de sens

sentient

sentient

[ˈsɛntɪənt] adj (frm) (creature, being) → sensibile, senziente
References in classic literature ?
When I was as old as you, I was a feeling fellow enough, partial to the unfledged, unfostered, and unlucky; but Fortune has knocked me about since: she has even kneaded me with her knuckles, and now I flatter myself I am hard and tough as an India-rubber ball; pervious, though, through a chink or two still, and with one sentient point in the middle of the lump.
If the room to which my bed was removed were a sentient thing that could give evidence, I might appeal to it at this day - who sleeps there now, I wonder
The Killer shuddered, scowling at the inanimate iron and wood of the spear as though they constituted a sentient being endowed with a malignant mind.
Dancing began; I should have liked well enough to be introduced to some pleasing and intelligent girl, and to have freedom and opportunity to show that I could both feel and communicate the pleasure of social intercourse--that I was not, in short, a block, or a piece of furniture, but an acting, thinking, sentient man.
Bread looked up the staircase and then down and then she looked at the undusted nymph, as if she possibly had sentient ears.
Then silence brooded over all--silence so complete that it seemed in itself a sentient thing--silence which seemed like incarnate darkness, and conveyed the same idea to all who came within its radius.
The sun, on account of the mist, had a curious sentient, personal look, demanding the masculine pronoun for its adequate expression.
He seemed a part of the mute melancholy landscape, an incarnation of its frozen woe, with all that was warm and sentient in him fast bound below the surface; but there was nothing unfriendly in his silence.
Naked and unarmed, as I was, my end would have been both speedy and horrible at the hands of these cruel creatures had I had time to put my resolve into execution, but at the moment of the shriek each member of the herd turned in the direction from which the sound seemed to come, and at the same instant every particular snake-like hair upon their heads rose stiffly perpendicular as if each had been a sentient organism looking or listening for the source or meaning of the wail.
Not four hours since he had been on one of those very airships, and yet they seemed to him now not gas-bags carrying men, but strange sentient creatures that moved about and did things with a purpose of their own.
She was glowing from her morning toilet as only healthful youth can glow: there was gem-like brightness on her coiled hair and in her hazel eyes; there was warm red life in her lips; her throat had a breathing whiteness above the differing white of the fur which itself seemed to wind about her neck and cling down her blue-gray pelisse with a tenderness gathered from her own, a sentient commingled innocence which kept its loveliness against the crystalline purity of the outdoor snow.
When Master Bloomfield's amusements consist in injuring sentient creatures,' I answered, 'I think it my duty to interfere.