sentiment


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sen·ti·ment

 (sĕn′tə-mənt)
n.
1. A thought, view, or attitude, especially one based mainly on emotion instead of reason: An anti-American sentiment swept through the country. See Synonyms at view.
2.
a. Emotion; feeling: Different forms of music convey different kinds of sentiment.
b. Tender or romantic feeling: felt strong sentiment for each other.
c. Maudlin emotion; sentimentality: "He called her 'beloved madame,' and many other endearments, delivered with gallant mushiness, irony damascened with sentiment" (Robert D. Richardson).
3. The thought or emotion that underlies a remark or gesture: The child's gift was ridiculous, but the sentiment behind it moved the mother to tears.
4. The expression of delicate and sensitive feeling, especially in art and literature.

[Middle English sentement, from Old French, from Medieval Latin sentīmentum, from Latin sentīre, to feel; see sent- in Indo-European roots.]

sentiment

(ˈsɛntɪmənt)
n
1. susceptibility to tender, delicate, or romantic emotion: she has too much sentiment to be successful.
2. (often plural) a thought, opinion, or attitude
3. exaggerated, overindulged, or mawkish feeling or emotion
4. an expression of response to deep feeling, esp in art or literature
5. a feeling, emotion, or awareness: a sentiment of pity.
6. a mental attitude modified or determined by feeling: there is a strong revolutionary sentiment in his country.
7. a feeling conveyed, or intended to be conveyed, in words
[C17: from Medieval Latin sentīmentum, from Latin sentīre to feel]

sen•ti•ment

(ˈsɛn tə mənt)

n.
1. an attitude or feeling toward something; opinion.
2. refined or tender emotion, esp. as expressed in an artistic work.
3. a thought influenced by emotion.
4. the emotional content of something as distinguished from its verbal expression.
[1325–75; Middle English sentement < Old French < Medieval Latin sentīmentum]
syn: See feeling.

Sentiment

 
  1. Like most sentimentalists, his heart’s as chilly as the Pole —Frank Swinnerton
  2. Nostalgia … like a lover’s pain in the chest —John Hersey
  3. Nostalgic … like a letter from home —Mahalia Jackson

    Jackson’s frame of reference, gospel music, is particularly appropriate.

  4. Sentimental as flowers pressed between the pages of a diary —Anon
  5. (I’ve been) talking sentiment like a turtledove —Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.sentiment - tender, romantic, or nostalgic feeling or emotionsentiment - tender, romantic, or nostalgic feeling or emotion
feeling - the experiencing of affective and emotional states; "she had a feeling of euphoria"; "he had terrible feelings of guilt"; "I disliked him and the feeling was mutual"
sentimentality - extravagant or affected feeling or emotion
razbliuto - the sentimental feeling you have about someone you once loved but no longer do
2.sentiment - a personal belief or judgment that is not founded on proof or certaintysentiment - a personal belief or judgment that is not founded on proof or certainty; "my opinion differs from yours"; "I am not of your persuasion"; "what are your thoughts on Haiti?"
idea - a personal view; "he has an idea that we don't like him"
judgment, judgement, mind - an opinion formed by judging something; "he was reluctant to make his judgment known"; "she changed her mind"
belief - any cognitive content held as true
eyes - opinion or judgment; "in the eyes of the law"; "I was wrong in her eyes"
parti pris, preconceived idea, preconceived notion, preconceived opinion, preconception, prepossession - an opinion formed beforehand without adequate evidence; "he did not even try to confirm his preconceptions"
pole - one of two divergent or mutually exclusive opinions; "they are at opposite poles"; "they are poles apart"
political sympathies, politics - the opinion you hold with respect to political questions

sentiment

noun
1. feeling, thought, idea, view, opinion, attitude, belief, judgment, persuasion, way of thinking The Foreign Secretary echoed this sentiment.
2. sentimentality, emotion, tenderness, romanticism, sensibility, slush (informal), emotionalism, tender feeling, mawkishness, soft-heartedness, overemotionalism Laura kept that letter out of sentiment.

sentiment

noun
1. A general cast of mind with regard to something:
2. Something believed or accepted as true by a person:
3. A complex and usually strong subjective response, such as love or hate:
4. The capacity for or an act of responding to a stimulus:
Translations
شُعور رَقيق، عاطِفَه
cit
følelse
tilfinning
keliantis švelnius jausmussentimentaliaisentimentalumassentimentalus
jūtas

sentiment

[ˈsentɪmənt] N
1. (= feeling) → sentimiento m
2. (= opinion, thought) → opinión f, juicio m
those are my sentiments tooése es mi criterio también, así lo pienso yo también
3. (= sentimentality) → sentimentalismo m, sensiblería f
to wallow in sentimentnadar en el sentimentalismo or la sensiblería

sentiment

[ˈsɛntɪmənt] n
(= emotion) → sentiment m
(= opinion) → sentiment m
These sentiments were echoed by other speakers → D'autres intervenants se sont fait l'écho de ces sentiments.

sentiment

n
(= feeling, emotion)Gefühl nt
(= sentimentality)Sentimentalität f, → Rührseligkeit f
(= opinion)Ansicht f, → Meinung f; what are your sentiments on this?was ist Ihre Meinung or Ansicht dazu?, wie denken Sie darüber?; my sentiments exactly!genau meine Ansicht or Meinung!
(= thought behind words or deeds)Gedanke m

sentiment

[ˈsɛntɪmənt] n
a. (feeling) → sentimento; (opinion) → opinione f
b. (sentimentality) → sentimentalismo

sentiment

(ˈsentimənt) noun
tender feeling or emotion. a song full of patriotic sentiment.
ˌsentiˈmental (-ˈmen-) adjective
1. (sometimes with about) having, showing or causing much tender feeling. a sentimental person; a sentimental film about a little boy and a donkey.
2. of the emotions or feelings. The ring has sentimental value, as my husband gave it to me.
ˌsentiˈmentally adverb
ˌsentimenˈtality (-ˈtӕ-) noun

sen·ti·ment

n. sentimiento.
References in classic literature ?
And speaking of sentiment brings us very naturally to the `Dovecote'.
I have a pre- sentiment," he declared emphatically.
The sentiment which she entertained for Robert in no way resembled that which she felt for her husband, or had ever felt, or ever expected to feel.
At the end of what might be called each verse he made a pause, by raising a note louder and longer than common, that was peculiarly suited to the sentiment just expressed.
If there had only been sentiment of any kind connected with any of them
Let us pardon her one other pause; for it is given to the sole sentiment, or, we might better say, --heightened and rendered intense, as it has been, by sorrow and seclusion,--to the strong passion of her life.
The sentiment is probably assignable to the deep and aged roots which my family has stuck into the soil.
His "my dear" was constantly on his lips for me, and nothing could have expressed more the exact shade of the sentiment with which I desired to inspire my pupils than its fond familiarity.
And the honest drover, in his warmth, endorsed this moral sentiment by firing a perfect feu de joi at the fireplace.
So I am a Yankee of the Yankees -- and practical; yes, and nearly barren of sentiment, I suppose -- or poetry, in other words.
Hoch has a good many cart-loads of the Black Forest currency himself, and therefore is a good catch; but he is sordid, mean, and without sentiment, whereas Gretchen is all sentiment and poetry.
He had heard that Tom had been trying to get his father to sell the boy down the river, and he wanted to prevent the scandal--for public sentiment did not approve of that way of treating family servants for light cause or for no cause.