separationism


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separationism

(ˌsɛpəˈreɪʃənˌɪzəm)
n
(Philosophy) another word for separatism
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.separationism - advocacy of a policy of strict separation of church and state
separation - the social act of separating or parting company; "the separation of church and state"
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The short postscript talks mostly about Jefferson's alleged extreme notion of church-state separationism that was enshrined into American constitutional law by the Supreme Court in the twentieth century.
Yet he clearly distinguished between his love for America and his commitment to separationism and religious liberty.
Jones sees leeway as "essentially an exercise in capitalizing on the conspicuous features of separationism .
For the Catholic Bishops were right, in their 1948 statement: a certain extreme version of separationism is really nothing more than the establishment of secularism.
Tuttle, Historic Preservation Grants to Houses of Worship: A Case Study in the Survival of Separationism, 43 B.
Beckwith's own treatment of radical church-state separationism, drawing on the work of Philip Hamburger, reveals how a concept once advanced in America by Protestants wary of Catholic influences has developed into a weapon wielded by secularists bent on suppressing the influence of Christianity altogether.
The third position falls somewhere in between the two and is probably the most invoked position in recent times--neutral separationism.
More fundamentally, liberal critics failed to understand how the shifting constitutional and statutory framework that gave momentum to the faith-based initiative had an even deeper provenance in the broader political economy of welfare spending, which, over the previous three decades, had been dramatically transformed in ways that made the comparatively extreme church-state separationism prevalent at the beginning of that era increasingly volatile and unsustainable.
See Shane, supra note 41, at 389 (explaining that this approach to government, with an emphasis on checks and balances instead of formal separationism, "helps promote public faith in government").
In these circumstances, I do not see that "no aid" separationism can be a viable policy.
After a period of separationism, being religious is once more understood to be part of being human, not something that sets you apart.