serf


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serf

 (sûrf)
n.
1. A member of the lowest feudal class, legally bound to a landed estate and required to perform labor for the lord of that estate in exchange for a personal allotment of land.
2. An agricultural laborer under various similar systems, especially in Russia and eastern Europe in the 1700s and 1800s.
3. A person in bondage or servitude.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Latin servus, slave.]

serf′dom n.

serf

(sɜːf)
n
(Historical Terms) (esp in medieval Europe) an unfree person, esp one bound to the land. If his lord sold the land, the serf was passed on to the new landlord
[C15: from Old French, from Latin servus a slave; see serve]
ˈserfdom, ˈserfhood n
ˈserfˌlike adj

serf

(sɜrf)

n.
1. a person in a condition of feudal servitude, required to render services to a lord, commonly attached to the lord's land and transferred with it from one owner to another.
2. a slave.
[1475–85; < Middle French < Latin servus slave]
serf′dom, serf′hood, serf′age, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.serf - (Middle Ages) a person who is bound to the land and owned by the feudal lordserf - (Middle Ages) a person who is bound to the land and owned by the feudal lord
Europe - the 2nd smallest continent (actually a vast peninsula of Eurasia); the British use `Europe' to refer to all of the continent except the British Isles
cottier, cotter - a medieval English villein
thrall - someone held in bondage
Dark Ages, Middle Ages - the period of history between classical antiquity and the Italian Renaissance

serf

noun vassal, servant, slave, thrall, bondsman, varlet (archaic), helot, villein, liegeman He was the son of an emancipated serf.
Translations

serf

[sɜːf] Nsiervo/a m/f (de la gleba)

serf

[ˈsɜːrf] nserf (serve)m/f

serf

nLeibeigene(r) mf

serf

[sɜːf] nservo/a della gleba
References in classic literature ?
The occasional emergence of an Equilateral from the ranks of his serf-born ancestors is welcomed, not only by the poor serfs themselves, as a gleam of light and hope shed upon the monotonous squalor of their existence, but also by the Aristocracy at large; for all the higher classes are well aware that these rare phenomena, while they do little or nothing to vulgarize their own privileges, serve as a most useful barrier against revolution from below.
No longer ago than last night at the `Pied Merlin,'" the clerk answered, recognizing the escaped serf who had been so outspoken as to his wrongs.
I give not the pip of an apple for king or for noble," cried the serf passionately.
He must bring nothing outside; we will go in -- in among the dirt, and possibly other repulsive things, -- and take the food with the household, and after the fashion of the house, and all on equal terms, except the man be of the serf class; and finally, there will be no ewer and no napkin, whether he be serf or free.
Freeman and slave, patrician and plebeian, lord and serf, guild-master and journeyman, in a word, oppressor and oppressed, stood in constant opposition to one another, carried on an uninterrupted, now hidden, now open fight, a fight that each time ended, either in a revolutionary re-constitution of society at large, or in the common ruin of the contending classes.
The serf, in the period of serfdom, raised himself to membership in the commune, just as the petty bourgeois, under the yoke of feudal absolutism, managed to develop into a bourgeois.
Recruited from all ranks of society and from every civilized country of Europe the great horde of Torn numbered in its ten companies serf and noble; Britain, Saxon, Norman, Dane, German, Italian and French, Scot, Pict and Irish.
Here birth caused no distinctions; the escaped serf, with the gall marks of his brass collar still visible about his neck, rode shoulder to shoulder with the outlawed scion of a noble house.
We of the Revolution will go on with that great work, but it will not be done by the miserable serfs.
It was fifty-two years in the building, during which time a permanent army of half a million serfs was employed.
Excuse me," Sergey Ivanovitch interposed with a smile, "self-interest did not induce us to work for the emancipation of the serfs, but we did work for it.
Konstantin Levin broke in with still greater heat; "the emancipation of the serfs was a different matter.