series


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se·ries

 (sîr′ēz)
n. pl. series
1. A number of objects or events arranged or coming one after the other in succession.
2. A set of stamps, coins, or currency issued in a particular period.
3. Physics & Chemistry A group of objects related by linearly varying successive differences in form or configuration: a radioactive decay series; the paraffin alkane series.
4. Mathematics The sum of a sequentially ordered finite or infinite set of terms.
5. Geology A group of rock formations closely related in time of origin and distinct as a group from other formations.
6. Grammar A succession of coordinate elements in a sentence.
7.
a. A succession of publications having similar subjects or similar formats.
b. A succession of regularly broadcast television programs, especially the set of episodes of a drama or sitcom.
8.
a. Sports A number of games played by the same two teams, often in succession.
b. Baseball The World Series.
9. Linguistics A set of vowels or diphthongs related by ablaut, as in sing, sang, sung, and song.
Idiom:
in series
In an arrangement that forms a series.

[Latin seriēs, from serere, to join; see ser- in Indo-European roots.]
Synonyms: series, chain, progression, sequence, string, succession
These nouns denote a number of things placed or occurring one after the other: a series of days, a series of facts; a chain of command, a chain of proof; a progression of courses toward a degree, a progression of prime numbers; a sequence of a chemical reactions, the sequence of events leading to the accident; a string of islands, a string of questions; a succession of failures, a succession of actors auditioning for the play.
Usage Note: Series is both a singular and a plural form. When it has the singular sense of "one set," it takes a singular verb, even when series is followed by of and a plural noun: A series of lectures is scheduled. When it has the plural sense of "two or more sets," it takes a plural verb: Two series of lectures are scheduled: one for experts and one for laypeople.

series

(ˈsɪəriːz; -rɪz)
n, pl -ries
1. a group or connected succession of similar or related things, usually arranged in order
2. (Broadcasting) a set of radio or television programmes having the same characters and setting but different stories
3. (Journalism & Publishing) a set of books having the same format, related content, etc, published by one firm
4. a set of stamps, coins, etc, issued at a particular time
5. (Mathematics) maths the sum of a finite or infinite sequence of numbers or quantities. See also geometric series
6. (Electronics) electronics
a. a configuration of two or more components connected in a circuit so that the same current flows in turn through each of them (esp in the phrase in series)
b. (as modifier): a series circuit. Compare parallel10
7. (Rhetoric) rhetoric a succession of coordinate elements in a sentence
8. (Geological Science) geology a stratigraphical unit that is a subdivision of a system and represents the rocks formed during an epoch
[C17: from Latin: a row, from serere to link]

se•ries

(ˈsɪər iz)

n., pl. -ries.
1. a group or a number of related or similar things, events, etc., arranged or occurring in temporal, spatial, or other order or succession; sequence.
2. a number of games, contests, or sporting events, with the same participants, considered as a unit.
3. a set, as of coins or postage stamps.
4. a set of successive volumes or of issues of a periodical published in like form with similarity of subject or purpose.
5. Radio and Television.
a. a daily or weekly program with a set format, a regular cast of characters, and sometimes a continuing story, as a situation comedy or a soap opera.
b. two or more programs related by theme, format, or the like: a series on African wildlife.
6. a sequence of terms combined by addition, as 1 + ½ + ¼ + ? + … + ½ n.
7. a succession of coordinate sentence elements.
8. a division of stratified rocks that is of next higher rank to a stage and next lower rank to a system, comprising deposits formed during part of a geological epoch.
9. an arrangement of an electrical circuit in which the components are connected end-to-end, so that the same current flows through each component.
10. a group of related chemical elements arranged in order of increasing atomic number.
[1605–15; < Latin seriēs; akin to serere to intertwine]
syn: series, sequence, succession are terms for an orderly following of things one after another. series is applied to a number of things of the same kind, usu. related to each other, arranged or happening in order: a series of baseball games. sequence stresses the continuity in time, thought, cause and effect, etc.: The scenes came in a definite sequence. succession implies that one thing is followed by another or others in turn, usu. though not necessarily with a relation or connection between them: a succession of calamities.

se·ries

(sîr′ēz)
Mathematics
The sum of a sequence of terms, for example 2 + 22 + 23 + 24 + 25 + ...

Series

 a number of things or events linked by some factor. See also chain.
Examples:

series

The rocks formed during a geological epoch.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.series - similar things placed in order or happening one after anotherseries - similar things placed in order or happening one after another; "they were investigating a series of bank robberies"
Stations, Stations of the Cross - (Roman Catholic Church) a devotion consisting of fourteen prayers said before a series of fourteen pictures or carvings representing successive incidents during Jesus' passage from Pilate's house to his crucifixion at Calvary
chain, concatenation - a series of things depending on each other as if linked together; "the chain of command"; "a complicated concatenation of circumstances"
cordon - a series of sentinels or of military posts enclosing or guarding some place or thing
course, line - a connected series of events or actions or developments; "the government took a firm course"; "historians can only point out those lines for which evidence is available"
cycle - a series of poems or songs on the same theme; "Schubert's song cycles"
electrochemical series, electromotive force series, electromotive series - a serial arrangement of metallic elements or ions according to their electrode potentials determined under specified conditions; the order shows the tendency of one metal to reduce the ions of any other metal below it in the series
hierarchy - a series of ordered groupings of people or things within a system; "put honesty first in her hierarchy of values"
ordering, ordination, order - logical or comprehensible arrangement of separate elements; "we shall consider these questions in the inverse order of their presentation"
nexus - a connected series or group
patterned advance, progression - a series with a definite pattern of advance
blizzard, rash - a series of unexpected and unpleasant occurrences; "a rash of bank robberies"; "a blizzard of lawsuits"
sequence - serial arrangement in which things follow in logical order or a recurrent pattern; "the sequence of names was alphabetical"; "he invented a technique to determine the sequence of base pairs in DNA"
train, string - a sequentially ordered set of things or events or ideas in which each successive member is related to the preceding; "a string of islands"; "train of mourners"; "a train of thought"
succession - a group of people or things arranged or following in order; "a succession of stalls offering soft drinks"; "a succession of failures"
wave train - a succession of waves spaced at regular intervals
helium group - the series of inert gases
actinide series - (chemistry) a series of 15 radioactive elements with increasing atomic numbers from actinium to lawrencium
lanthanide series - the rare-earth elements with atomic numbers 57 through 71; having properties similar to lanthanum
2.series - a serialized set of programs; "a comedy series"; "the Masterworks concert series"
broadcast, program, programme - a radio or television show; "did you see his program last night?"
instalment, installment, episode - a part of a broadcast serial
soap opera - a serialized program usually dealing with sentimentalized family matters that is broadcast on radio or television (frequently sponsored by a company advertising soap products)
tetralogy - a series of four related works (plays or operas or novels)
3.series - a periodical that appears at scheduled times
instalment, installment - a part of a published serial
periodical - a publication that appears at fixed intervals
semiweekly - a periodical that is published twice each week (or 104 issues per year)
weekly - a periodical that is published every week (or 52 issues per year)
semimonthly - a periodical that is published twice each month (or 24 issues per year)
monthly - a periodical that is published every month (or 12 issues per year)
quarterly - a periodical that is published every quarter (or four issues per year)
bimonthly - a periodical that is published twice a month or every two months (either 24 or 6 issues per year)
biweekly - a periodical that is published twice a week or every two weeks (either 104 or 26 issues per year)
issue, number - one of a series published periodically; "she found an old issue of the magazine in her dentist's waiting room"
4.series - (sports) several contests played successively by the same teams; "the visiting team swept the series"
athletics, sport - an active diversion requiring physical exertion and competition
contest, competition - an occasion on which a winner is selected from among two or more contestants
home stand - a series of successive games played at a team's home field or court
World Series - series that constitutes the playoff for the baseball championship; "we watched the World Series on TV"
5.series - (electronics) connection of components in such a manner that current flows first through one and then through the other; "the voltage divider consisted of a series of fixed resistors"
electronics - the branch of physics that deals with the emission and effects of electrons and with the use of electronic devices
connection, connexion, connectedness - a relation between things or events (as in the case of one causing the other or sharing features with it); "there was a connection between eating that pickle and having that nightmare"
6.series - a group of postage stamps having a common theme or a group of coins or currency selected as a group for study or collection; "the Post Office issued a series commemorating famous American entertainers"; "his coin collection included the complete series of Indian-head pennies"
group, grouping - any number of entities (members) considered as a unit
7.series - (mathematics) the sum of a finite or infinite sequence of expressions
multinomial, polynomial - a mathematical function that is the sum of a number of terms
power series - the sum of terms containing successively higher integral powers of a variable
convergency, convergence - the approach of an infinite series to a finite limit
divergency, divergence - an infinite series that has no limit
geometric series - a geometric progression written as a sum
Fourier series - the sum of a series of trigonometric expressions; used in the analysis of periodic functions
math, mathematics, maths - a science (or group of related sciences) dealing with the logic of quantity and shape and arrangement
exponential series - a series derived from the expansion of an exponential expression

series

noun
2. drama, serial, soap (informal), sitcom (informal), soap opera, situation comedy, set of programmes Channel 4's `GBH' won best drama series.

series

noun
A number of things placed or occurring one after the other:
Informal: streak.
Translations
سِلْسِلَهمُتَتَالِيَة
řadaseriálsérie
rækkeserie
sarja
serijared
sorsorozat
röî, sería, syrpa
ひと続き
일련
daugiaserijiniskelių dalių tęstinis pasakojimaspaeiliui einantisserialasserialo statymas
seriālssērija
serie
edícia
nadaljevankananizankavrsta
seriesummasvitföljdföljetong
สิ่งที่ต่อเนื่องกัน
chuỗi

series

[ˈsɪərɪz]
A. N (series (pl))
1. (gen, TV) → serie f; [of lectures, films] → ciclo m
a series of eventsuna serie de acontecimientos
2. (Math) → serie f, progresión f
3. (Elec) to connect in seriesconectar en serie
B. CPD series producer N (TV) → productor(a) m/f de la serie

series

[ˈsɪəriːz] n
(on TV, radio)série f
A new series starts on Friday → Une nouvelle série commence vendredi.
a TV series → une série télévisée
a comedy series → une série comique
a cookery series → une émission de cuisine
(= succession) → série f
a series of meetings → une série de réunions
(= set of books, films) → série f
the Harry Potter series of novels → la série des romans de Harry Potter

series

n pl <->
Serie f; (of books, lectures etc also, of films, talks, Math, Mus, Elec) → Reihe f; (of events also, succession of things)Reihe f, → Folge f; a series of articleseine Artikelserie or -reihe; in seriesder Reihe nach; (Elec) → in Reihe; (Comm) → serienmäßig; publishals Serie
(Rad) → Sendereihe f; (TV) → Serie f

series

[ˈsɪərɪz] n pl inv (gen) (Radio, TV) → serie f inv; (set of books) → collana

series

(ˈsiəriːz) plural ˈseries noun
a number of usually similar things done, produced etc one after another. a series of brilliant scientific discoveries; Are you watching the television series on Britain's castles?; a series of school textbooks.
ˈserial (-riəl) adjective
1. of or in a series. serial numbers on banknotes.
2. (of a story etc) published or broadcast in parts.
noun
a serial story, play etc.
ˈserial killer noun
a person who has murdered several people one after another.
ˈserialize, ˈserialise (-riə-) verb
to publish or broadcast as a serial.
ˌserialiˈzation, ˌserialiˈsation noun

series

مُتَتَالِيَة řada serie Serie σειρά serie sarja série serija serie ひと続き 일련 reeks serie szereg série серия serie สิ่งที่ต่อเนื่องกัน dizi chuỗi 系列

ser·ies

n. serie, grupo de espécimenes en una secuencia.

series

n (pl series) serie f
References in classic literature ?
A quick temper, sharp tongue, and restless spirit were always getting her into scrapes, and her life was a series of ups and downs, which were both comic and pathetic.
She was in that condition because of a series of circumstances also curious.
Nature was here a series of wonders, and a fund of delight.
But the story would include a chain of events extending over the better part of two centuries, and, written out with reasonable amplitude, would fill a bigger folio volume, or a longer series of duodecimos, than could prudently be appropriated to the annals of all New England during a similar period.
Human nature will not flourish, any more than a potato, if it be planted and re-planted, for too long a series of generations, in the same worn-out soil.
It had all been a great worry and, on his own part doubtless, a series of blunders, but he immensely pitied the poor chicks and had done all he could; had in particular sent them down to his other house, the proper place for them being of course the country, and kept them there, from the first, with the best people he could find to look after them, parting even with his own servants to wait on them and going down himself, whenever he might, to see how they were doing.
On one side hung a very large oil-painting so thoroughly besmoked, and every way defaced, that in the unequal cross-lights by which you viewed it, it was only by diligent study and a series of systematic visits to it, and careful inquiry of the neighbors, that you could any way arrive at an understanding of its purpose.
Those who prefer to, go on with the two-step, but the majority go through an intricate series of motions, resembling more fancy skating than a dance.
This feature may be described as a series of glass-enclosed parlors CLINGING TO THE OUTSIDE OF THE HOUSE, one against each and every bed-chamber and drawing-room.
However, this thought, like all others, came and went in a flash, for the whole morning was like a series of magic lantern pictures, crossing and recrossing her field of vision.
It was the first of a long series of such out- rages, of which I was doomed to be a witness and a participant.
He had gone away rejected and mortifieddisappointed in a very sanguine hope, after a series of what appeared to him strong encouragement; and not only losing the right lady, but finding himself debased to the level of a very wrong one.