servitude


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ser·vi·tude

 (sûr′vĭ-to͞od′, -tyo͞od′)
n.
1.
a. A state of subjection to an owner or master.
b. Lack of personal freedom, as to act as one chooses.
2. Forced labor imposed as a punishment for crime: penal servitude in labor camps.
3. Law An easement.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Late Latin servitūdō, from Latin servus, slave.]

servitude

(ˈsɜːvɪˌtjuːd)
n
1. the state or condition of a slave; bondage
2. the state or condition of being subjected to or dominated by a person or thing: servitude to drink.
3. (Law) law a burden attaching to an estate for the benefit of an adjoining estate or of some definite person. See also easement
4. (Law) short for penal servitude
[C15: via Old French from Latin servitūdō, from servus a slave]

ser•vi•tude

(ˈsɜr vɪˌtud, -ˌtyud)

n.
1. slavery or bondage of any kind.
2. compulsory service or labor as a punishment for criminals: penal servitude.
3. Law. a right held by one person to use another's property.
[1425–75; late Middle English < Late Latin servitūdō]
syn: See slavery.

Servitude

 slaves or servants, collectively, 1667.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.servitude - state of subjection to an owner or master or forced labor imposed as punishmentservitude - state of subjection to an owner or master or forced labor imposed as punishment; "penal servitude"
villainage, villeinage - the legal status or condition of servitude of a villein or feudal serf
slavery, thraldom, thrall, thralldom, bondage - the state of being under the control of another person

servitude

servitude

noun
A state of subjugation to an owner or master:
Translations
رِق، عُبودِيَّه
otroctví
slaveri
ServitutSklaverei
òrældómur
vergavimasvergystė
kalpībaverdzība
kölelik

servitude

[ˈsɜːvɪtjuːd] Nservidumbre f

servitude

[ˈsɜːrvɪtjuːd] nservitude f penal servitude

servitude

nKnechtschaft f

servitude

[ˈsɜːvɪtjuːd] nservitù f

servitude

(ˈsəːvitjuːd) noun
the state of being a slave. Their lives were spent in servitude.
References in classic literature ?
Cassy had always kept over Legree the kind of influence that a strong, impassioned woman can ever keep over the most brutal man; but, of late, she had grown more and more irritable and restless, under the hideous yoke of her servitude, and her irritability, at times, broke out into raving insanity; and this liability made her a sort of object of dread to Legree, who had that superstitious horror of insane persons which is common to coarse and uninstructed minds.
Apostat, still thou errst, nor end wilt find Of erring, from the path of truth remote: Unjustly thou deprav'st it with the name Of SERVITUDE to serve whom God ordains, Or Nature; God and Nature bid the same, When he who rules is worthiest, and excells Them whom he governs.
And with the back of his hand he struck Cedric's cap from the head of the Jester, and throwing open his collar, discovered the fatal badge of servitude, the silver collar round his neck.
Let the compromising expedient of the Constitution be mutually adopted, which regards them as inhabitants, but as debased by servitude below the equal level of free inhabitants, which regards the SLAVE as divested of two fifths of the MAN.
One must needs have been a minister dismissed from power to comprehend the bitter pain which came upon Madame du Bousquier when she found herself reduced to this absolute servitude.
The Emperor of Constantinople,[*] to oppose his neighbours, sent ten thousand Turks into Greece, who, on the war being finished, were not willing to quit; this was the beginning of the servitude of Greece to the infidels.
Of course, all crimes are not crimes against property, though such are the crimes that the English law, valuing what a man has more than what a man is, punishes with the harshest and most horrible severity, if we except the crime of murder, and regard death as worse than penal servitude, a point on which our criminals, I believe, disagree.
But, after all, these things could have been endured awhile, had we entertained the hope of being speedily delivered from them by the due completion of the term of our servitude.
If a Templar would smile at the qualifications of Marmaduke to fill the judicial seat he occupied, we are certain that a graduate of Leyden or Edinburgh would be extremely amused with this true narration of the servitude of Elnathan in the temple of Aesculapius.
The portress replied, as the portress invariably replies, that her lodger had gone out barely three minutes before; but then, through the little square hole of her lodge-window taking the measure of Newman's fortunes, and seeing them, by an unspecified process, refresh the dry places of servitude to occupants of fifth floors on courts, she added that M.
In one shop there were a great many crowns of laurel and myrtle, which soldiers, authors, statesmen, and various other people pressed eagerly to buy; some purchased these paltry wreaths with their lives, others by a toilsome servitude of years, and many sacrificed whatever was most valuable, yet finally slunk away without the crown.
Around the necks of the creatures were fastened black collars, (badges of servitude, no doubt,) such as we keep on our dogs, only much wider and infinitely stiffer, so that it was quite impossible for these poor victims to move their heads in any direction without moving the body at the same time; and thus they were doomed to perpetual contemplation of their noses -- a view puggish and snubby in a wonderful, if not positively in an awful degree.