set off


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Financial, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to set off: set off against

set 1

 (sĕt)
v. set, set·ting, sets
v.tr.
1. To put in a specified position or arrangement; place: set a book on a table; set the photo next to the flowers.
2.
a. To put into a specified state: set the prisoner at liberty; set the house ablaze; set the machine in motion.
b. To cause to begin an action: The noise set the dog to barking.
c. To cause or assign (someone) to undertake an action or perform a service: The sergeant set the recruit to sweeping the barracks.
d. To incite to hostile feeling or action: a dispute that set the neighbors against each other.
3. To position (oneself) so as to be ready to do something, such as start running a race.
4. To put into a stable or fixed position, as:
a. To position or secure so as to be fixed or immobile: set the fence post in cement.
b. To put in a mounting; mount: set an emerald in a pendant.
c. To apply jewels to; stud: The tiara was set with diamonds.
d. To cause (a hook) to become fixed in a fish's mouth.
5. To cause to be in proper, useful, or working condition, as:
a. To arrange for the consumption of a meal: set the table; set a place at table.
b. To adjust (an instrument or device) to a specific point or calibration: set the alarm for 7:00.
c. To prepare (a trap) for catching prey.
d. To adjust (a saw) by deflecting the teeth.
e. Nautical To spread open to the wind: set the sails.
f. To arrange scenery on (a theater stage).
g. To restore to a proper and normal state when dislocated or broken: set a broken arm.
h. To apply equipment, such as curlers and clips, to (hair) in order to style.
6.
a. To concentrate or direct (one's mind or attention, for example) on a purpose or goal.
b. To direct or focus (one's desires or hopes, for example) on a certain thing.
7. Sports To pass (a volleyball), usually with the fingertips, in an arc close to the net so that a teammate can drive it over the net.
8. Printing
a. To arrange (type) into words and sentences preparatory to printing; compose.
b. To transpose (text, for example) into type.
9. Music
a. To compose (music) to fit a given text.
b. To write (words) to fit a given melodic line.
10. To appoint, establish, or determine, as:
a. To declare or demonstrate (a precedent or standard, for instance).
b. To provide or establish as a model: A parent must set a good example for the children.
c. To establish as the highest level of performance: set a swimming record.
d. To arrange or establish (a computer password, for example) to allow future action.
e. To prescribe as a time for: set the meeting for Friday afternoon.
f. To prescribe the unfolding of (a drama or narrative, for instance) in a specific place: a play that is set in Venice.
11.
a. To value or regard something at the rate of: She sets a great deal by good nutrition.
b. To fix at a given amount: The judge set bail for the defendant at $50,000.
c. To make as an estimate of worth: We set a high value on human life.
12.
a. To cause to sit: Set yourself over by the fire.
b. To put (a hen) on eggs for the purpose of hatching them.
13. To point to the location of (game) by holding a fixed body position. Used of a hunting dog.
14. Botany To produce, as after pollination: set seed.
v.intr.
1. To disappear below the horizon: The sun set at seven that evening.
2. To diminish or decline; wane: when the glory of the empire set.
3. To sit on eggs. Used of fowl.
4.
a. To become fixed; harden: allowed the aspic to set.
b. To become permanent. Used of dye.
5. To become whole; knit. Used of a broken bone.
6. To point to the location of game by holding a fixed body position. Used of a hunting dog.
7. Botany To mature or develop, as after pollination.
8. Nonstandard To sit: "If Emmett drives, I could set up front" (Bobbie Ann Mason).
9. To position oneself preparatory to an action, such as running a race.
adj.
1. Fixed or established by agreement: a set time for the launching.
2. Established by convention: followed set procedures for filing a grievance.
3. Established deliberately; intentional: Our set purpose is to win the conflict.
4. Fixed and rigid: "His bearded face already has a set, hollow look" (Conor Cruise O'Brien).
5. Unwilling or very reluctant to change: He is set in his ways.
6.
a. Intent and determined: "He is dead set against rushing abroad to build a plant" (Fortune).
b. Ready; prepared: We are set to leave early tomorrow morning.
n.
1.
a. The act or process of setting.
b. The condition resulting from setting.
2. The manner in which something is positioned: the set of her cap.
3. A permanent firming or hardening of a substance, as by cooling.
4. The deflection of the teeth of a saw.
5.
a. The carriage or bearing of a part of the body.
b. A particular psychological state, usually that of anticipation or preparedness: "The mental set of an audience is crucial to his performance" (Psychology Today).
6. A descent below the horizon.
7. The direction or course of wind or water.
8. A seedling, slip, or cutting that is ready for planting.
9. The act of arranging hair by waving and curling it.
10. Sports The act of setting a volleyball for a teammate.
11. In Texas hold'em, a hand in which a player has two cards of the same rank and another card of that rank is among the community cards.
Phrasal Verbs:
set about
To begin or start: set about solving the problem.
set apart
1. To reserve for a specific use.
2. To make noticeable: character traits that set her apart.
set aside
1. To separate and reserve for a special purpose.
2. To discard or reject.
3. To declare invalid; annul or overrule: The court has set aside the conviction.
set at
To attack or assail: The dogs set at the fox.
set back
1. To slow down the progress of; hinder.
2. Informal To cost: That coat set me back $1,000.
set by
To reserve for future use: It is wise to set food and money by in case of a future emergency.
set down
1. To cause to sit; seat: Set the baby down here.
2. To put in writing; record: We set down the facts.
3.
a. To regard; consider: Just set him down as a sneak.
b. To assign to a cause; attribute: Let's set the error down to inexperience.
4. To land (an aircraft): The pilot set the plane down hard.
5. Baseball To put out (a batter); retire. Used of a pitcher.
set forth
1. To present for consideration; propose: set forth a sound plan.
2. To express in words: She has set forth her ideas.
set forward
To begin a journey.
set in
1. To insert: set in the sleeve of a gown.
2. To begin to happen or be apparent: "Evening was setting in as I took the road over Mountain Top" (Charles Siebert).
3. To move toward the shore. Used of wind or water.
set off
1.
a. To give rise to; cause to occur: set off a chemical reaction.
b. To cause to explode: set off a bomb.
c. To make suddenly or demonstrably angry: The clerk's indifference finally set me off.
2. To indicate as being different; distinguish: features setting him off from the crowd.
3. To direct attention to by contrast; accentuate: set off a passage with italics.
4. To counterbalance, counteract, or compensate for: Our dismay at her leaving was set off by our knowing that she was happy.
5. To start on a journey: set off for Europe.
set out
1. To begin an earnest attempt; undertake: He set out to understand why the plan had failed.
2. To lay out systematically or graphically: set out a terrace.
3. To display for exhibition or sale.
4. To plant: set out seedlings.
5. To start a journey: She set out at dawn for town.
set to
1. To begin working energetically; start in.
2. To begin fighting.
set up
1. To place in an upright position.
2.
a. To elevate; raise.
b. To raise in authority or power; invest with power: They set the general up as a dictator.
c. To put (oneself) forward as; claim to be: He has set himself up as an authority on the English language.
d. To assemble and erect: set up a new machine.
3. To establish; found: set up a charity.
4. To cause: They set up howls of protest over new taxes.
5. To establish in business by providing capital, equipment, or other backing.
6. Informal
a. To treat (someone) to drinks.
b. To pay for (drinks).
7. Informal To stimulate or exhilarate: a victory that really set the team up.
8. To lay plans for: set up a kidnapping.
9. Informal To put (someone else) into a compromising situation by deceit or trickery: Swindlers have set me up.
10. Sports To make a pass to (a teammate), creating a scoring opportunity.
set upon
To attack violently: Guards set dogs upon the escaping prisoners.
Idioms:
set against
Strongly opposed to: We are dead set against the idea.
set fire to
To cause to ignite and burn.
set foot in
To enter.
set foot on
To step on.
set in motion
To give impetus to: The indictment set the judicial process in motion.
set on
Resolved to do something or strongly wishing for something: She is set on getting a role in the play.
set (one's) heart on
To be determined to do something.
set (one's) sights on
To have as a goal: She set her sights on medical school.
set on fire
1. To cause to ignite and burn.
2. To cause to become excited: The music set the audience on fire.
set sail Nautical
To begin a voyage on water.
set (someone) straight
To inform (someone) of the truth of a situation.
set store by
To regard as valuable or worthwhile.
set the pace
1. To go at a speed that other competitors attempt to match or surpass.
2. To behave or perform in a way that others try to emulate.
set the scene/stage for
To provide the underlying basis for: saber rattling that set the stage for war.
set up housekeeping
To establish a household.
set up shop
To establish one's business operations.

[Middle English setten, from Old English settan; see sed- in Indo-European roots.]
Usage Note: Originally set meant "to cause (someone) to sit" and "to cause (something) to be in a certain position," so that it is now in most cases a transitive verb: She sets the book on the table. He sets the table. Sit is generally an intransitive verb: He sits at the table. There are some exceptions: The sun sets (not sits). A hen sets (or sits) on her eggs.

set 2

 (sĕt)
n.
1. A group of things of the same kind that belong together and are so used: a chess set.
2. A group of persons sharing a common interest: the high-school set.
3. A group of books or periodicals published as a unit.
4.
a. A number of couples required for participation in a square dance.
b. The movements constituting a square dance.
5.
a. The scenery constructed for a theatrical performance.
b. The entire enclosure in which a movie is filmed; the sound stage.
6. Music
a. A session of music, typically dance music, played before an intermission.
b. The music so played.
7. The collective receiving apparatus assembled to operate a radio or television.
8. Mathematics A collection of distinct elements having specific common properties: a set of positive integers.
9. Sports
a. A group of games constituting one division or unit of a match, as in tennis.
b. An offensive formation in football or basketball.

[Middle English sette, from Old French, from Medieval Latin secta, retinue, from Latin, faction; see sect.]

Set

 (sĕt)
n. Mythology
Variant of Seth2.

set off

vb (adverb)
1. (intr) to embark on a journey
2. (tr) to cause (a person) to act or do something, such as laugh or tell stories
3. (tr) to cause to explode
4. (tr) to act as a foil or contrast to, esp so as to improve: that brooch sets your dress off well.
5. (Accounting & Book-keeping) (tr) accounting to cancel a credit on (one account) against a debit on another, both of which are in the name of the same person, enterprise, etc
6. (Banking & Finance) (intr) to bring a claim by way of setoff
n
7. anything that serves as a counterbalance
8. anything that serves to contrast with or enhance something else; foil
9. (Architecture) another name for setback. See set back6
10. (Banking & Finance) a counterbalancing debt or claim offered by a debtor against a creditor
11. (Banking & Finance) a cross claim brought by a debtor that partly offsets the creditor's claim. See also counterclaim
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.set off - put in motion or move to actset off - put in motion or move to act; "trigger a reaction"; "actuate the circuits"
initiate, pioneer - take the lead or initiative in; participate in the development of; "This South African surgeon pioneered heart transplants"
2.set off - leave; "The family took off for Florida"
go forth, leave, go away - go away from a place; "At what time does your train leave?"; "She didn't leave until midnight"; "The ship leaves at midnight"
lift off, take off - depart from the ground; "The plane took off two hours late"
roar off - leave; "The car roared off into the fog"
blaze out, blaze - move rapidly and as if blazing; "The spaceship blazed out into space"
sally forth, sally out - set out in a sudden, energetic or violent manner
3.set off - direct attention to, as if by means of contrast; "This dress accentuates your nice figure!"; "I set off these words by brackets"
pick up - lift out or reflect from a background; "The scarf picks up the color of the skirt"; "His eyes picked up his smile"
foreground, highlight, play up, spotlight - move into the foreground to make more visible or prominent; "The introduction highlighted the speaker's distinguished career in linguistics"
raise - bring (a surface or a design) into relief and cause to project; "raised edges"
accent, accentuate, emphasize, stress, punctuate, emphasise - to stress, single out as important; "Dr. Jones emphasizes exercise in addition to a change in diet"
4.set off - cause to burst with a violent release of energy; "We exploded the nuclear bomb"
change integrity - change in physical make-up
fulminate - cause to explode violently and with loud noise
dynamite - blow up with dynamite; "The rock was dynamited"
5.set off - make up for; "His skills offset his opponent's superior strength"
countervail, neutralize, counteract, counterbalance - oppose and mitigate the effects of by contrary actions; "This will counteract the foolish actions of my colleagues"
balance, equilibrise, equilibrize, equilibrate - bring into balance or equilibrium; "She has to balance work and her domestic duties"; "balance the two weights"
6.set off - set in motion or cause to begin; "The guide set the tour off to a good start"
commence, lead off, start, begin - set in motion, cause to start; "The U.S. started a war in the Middle East"; "The Iraqis began hostilities"; "begin a new chapter in your life"
7.set off - provoke or stir up; "incite a riot"; "set off great unrest among the people"
provoke, stimulate - provide the needed stimulus for
raise - activate or stir up; "raise a mutiny"

set 1

verb
1. To deposit in a specified place:
2. To put in or assign to a certain position or location:
3. To alter for proper functioning:
Music: attune.
4. To arrange tableware upon (a table) in preparation for a meal:
5. To place (a story, for example) in a designated setting:
6. To bring about or come to an agreement concerning:
7. To appoint and send to a particular place:
8. To calculate approximately:
9. To move (a weapon or blow, for example) in the direction of someone or something:
Military: lay.
10. To change or be changed from a liquid into a soft, semisolid, or solid mass:
11. To make or become physically hard:
phrasal verb
set aboutphrasal verb
set apartphrasal verb
set aside
To put an end to, especially formally and with authority:
phrasal verb
set back
To cause to be later or slower than expected or desired:
phrasal verb
set by
To reserve for the future:
phrasal verb
set down
1. To register in or as if in a book:
2. To come to rest on the ground:
phrasal verb
set forth
To state, as an idea, for consideration:
phrasal verb
set offphrasal verb
set out
2. To work out and arrange the parts or details of:
3. To proceed in a specified direction:
phrasal verb
set tophrasal verb
set up
1. To raise upright:
2. To bring into existence formally:
3. Informal. To pay for the food, drink, or entertainment of (another):
Informal: stand.
Slang: blow.
Idiom: stand treat.
adjective
2. In a definite and final form; not likely to change:
3. Fixed and distinct from others:
4. On an unwavering course of action:
5. In a state of preparedness:
Informal: go.
Slang: together.
Idioms: all set, in working order.
Translations
يَبْدأ الرِّحْلَهيَبْدَأُ رِحْلَةيُثير من جَديد، يُسَبِّبُ ثانِيَةًيُشْعِلُ مُفَرْقَعاتٍ نارِيَّه
odpálitpřimětvydat sevydat se navyvolat
udløsefå til at begynde
lähteä matkaan
krenuti
kiváltútnak indul
koma af staîleggja af staîsprengja, kveikja í
出発する
출발하다
kvitta
เริ่มเดินทาง
khởi hành

set

(set) present participle ˈsetting: past tense, past participle set verb
1. to put or place. She set the tray down on the table.
2. to put plates, knives, forks etc on (a table) for a meal. Please would you set the table for me?
3. to settle or arrange (a date, limit, price etc). It's difficult to set a price on a book when you don't know its value.
4. to give a person (a task etc) to do. The witch set the prince three tasks; The teacher set a test for her pupils; He should set the others a good example.
5. to cause to start doing something. His behaviour set people talking.
6. (of the sun etc) to disappear below the horizon. It gets cooler when the sun sets.
7. to become firm or solid. Has the concrete set?
8. to adjust (eg a clock or its alarm) so that it is ready to perform its function. He set the alarm for 7.00 a.m.
9. to arrange (hair) in waves or curls.
10. to fix in the surface of something, eg jewels in a ring.
11. to put (broken bones) into the correct position for healing. They set his broken arm.
adjective
1. fixed or arranged previously. There is a set procedure for doing this.
2. (often with on) ready, intending or determined (to do something). He is set on going.
3. deliberate. He had the set intention of hurting her.
4. stiff; fixed. He had a set smile on his face.
5. not changing or developing. set ideas.
6. (with with) having something set in it. a gold ring set with diamonds.
noun
1. a group of things used or belonging together. a set of carving tools; a complete set of (the novels of) Jane Austen.
2. an apparatus for receiving radio or television signals. a television/radio set.
3. a group of people. the musical set.
4. the process of setting hair. a shampoo and set.
5. scenery for a play or film. There was a very impressive set in the final act.
6. a group of six or more games in tennis. She won the first set and lost the next two.
ˈsetting noun
1. a background. This castle is the perfect setting for a murder.
2. an arrangement of jewels in eg a ring.
3. music composed for a poem etc. settings of folk songs.
ˈsetback noun
a delay in progress.
set phrase
a phrase which always occurs in one form, and which cannot be changed. `Of no fixed abode' is a set phrase.
ˈset-square noun
a triangular instrument with one right angle, used in geometrical drawing etc.
ˈsetting-lotion noun
a lotion that is used in setting the hair.
ˌset-ˈto
an argument or fight.
ˈset-up noun
an arrangement. There are several families living together in that house – it's a funny set-up.
all set (often with to)
ready or prepared (to do something); just on the point of (doing something). We were all set to leave when the phone rang.
set about
to begin. She set about planning her holiday; How will you set about this task?
set (someone) against (someone)
to cause (a person) to dislike (another person). She set the children against their father.
set aside
to keep for a special use or purpose. He set aside some cash for use at the weekend.
set back
to delay the progress of. His illness set him back a bit at school.
set down
(of a bus etc) to stop and let (passengers) out. The bus set us down outside the post-office.
set in
to begin or become established. Boredom soon set in among the children.
set off
1. (sometimes with on) to start a journey. We set off to go to the beach.
2. to cause to start doing something. She had almost stopped crying, but his harsh words set her off again.
3. to explode or ignite. You should let your father set off all the fireworks.
set (something or someone) on (someone)
to cause (eg dogs) to attack (a person). He set his dogs on me.
set out
1. to start a journey. He set out to explore the countryside.
2. to intend. I didn't set out to prove him wrong.
set to
to start to do something (vigorously). They set to, and finished the work the same day.
set up
1. to establish. When was the organization set up?
2. to arrange or construct. He set up the apparatus for the experiment.
set up camp
to erect tents etc. They set up camp in a field.
set up house
to establish one's own home. He'll soon be earning enough to set up house on his own.
set up shop
to start a shop.
set upon (also set on)
to attack. He set upon me in the dark.

set off

يَبْدَأُ رِحْلَة vydat se udløse aufbrechen ξεκινώ partir lähteä matkaan démarrer krenuti avviarsi 出発する 출발하다 op weg gaan sette av uwydatnić iniciar uma jornada, partir отправляться (в путь) kvitta เริ่มเดินทาง yola koyulmak khởi hành 出发
References in classic literature ?
Thus the beauty of day, and that of summer, is set off by the horrors of night and winter.
They both set off to the other end of the camp, but as it did not cover more than a surface of five hundred feet they quickly arrived at the tent they were looking for.
Our heroine obeyed with great sweetness, and without having been able to take leave of her lover she set off to go to Locrinos as to certain death.
No sooner said than done: the two mice set off for the town and arrived at the Town Mouse's residence late at night.
Vernon set off for London as soon as she had determined what should be done.
Philander set off in the direction that would put the greatest distance between themselves and the lion.
She brought me all my belongings that had been filched from me--rifle, ammunition, knife, and thermos bottle, and then hand in hand we descended the cliff and set off toward the north.
So I set off eastward along the south coast, hoping to find a house where I might warm myself, and perhaps get news of those I had lost.
They ordered the lackeys not to unsaddle the gorses, and to hold themselves in readiness to set off again immediately.
He remembered having crossed the road and seen the finger-post only a little while before Wildfire broke down; so, buttoning his coat, twisting the lash of his hunting-whip compactly round the handle, and rapping the tops of his boots with a self-possessed air, as if to assure himself that he was not at all taken by surprise, he set off with the sense that he was undertaking a remarkable feat of bodily exertion, which somehow and at some time he should be able to dress up and magnify to the admiration of a select circle at the Rainbow.
Finding him at his camp in Green River valley, he immediately furnished himself with the supplies; put himself at the head of the free trappers and Delawares, and set off with all speed, determined to follow hard upon the heels of Fitzpatrick and Bridger.
WHILE she adjusted the broad leaves that set off the pale fragrant butter as the primrose is set off by its nest of green I am afraid Hetty was thinking a great deal more of the looks Captain Donnithorne had cast at her than of Adam and his troubles.