settledness

settledness

(ˈsɛtəldnəs)
n
the quality or condition of being settled
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References in periodicals archive ?
For Ruth the area is positioned as 'unusual' in terms of the continuity and settledness of its population, and similarly in Cath's excerpt, though individuals and families on the road on which she lives come and go, the family makeup and dynamic of the area, its familial continuity and stability, ultimately remains untouched.
I have used the notion of (hau)ontology to characterize the lack (which is not necessarily absence of) of settledness of such things in the kind of everyday life studied.
Mansfield Park and Downton Abbey each work as metonyms for an entire way of life that must be preserved, a gracious life of nostalgically appealing settledness, belonging, and certainty.
There's a real continuity and settledness around the club, sprinkle a goalscorer like Jelavic on top and things are good.
The providers conform to a stereotypical image of providers in many ways: age, education level, formal instruction in English before and after arrival in Australia, degree of settledness, bi-national self-identification and even early signs that some are using English as much as their first language with the next generation.
The absence of backward branching represents the settledness of the past.
The peoples' tendency toward settledness and a desire to "go it alone" lead to systems of defeat that can only be overturned by a dynamic agency outside those systems.
The church has been unmoored and should joyfully take leave of the settledness of Constantinian social arrangements that gave it privilege and power.
This city without country or old-style town imposes a uniformity of way of life and the supremacy of mobility over settledness.
The three main sections of this volume: "Diaspora and Settledness," "Jewish Experience and the Holocaust," and "Literature and Cultural Exchange," are preceded by the foreword and introduction, as well as the opus "Occupying Landscape We Occupy Story We Occupy Landscape" by western Canadian writer Robert Kroetsch.
requiring settledness (al-istiqrar) but on the condition that this [earthly] body (al-jism) is found existing in its natural place (makanihi al-tabi i) which is the earth (al-ard), while the motion [of this body] toward it [the earth] is on the condition that this body is outside its [natural] place.
The elements vary, but in broad outline they are these: Trevor's characters achieve a present of some degree of settledness amid a set of complex, more or less harmonious relationships; against the background of familiar history, a shock of disruptive power is unexpectedly delivered; the main character or characters are called upon to reconcile a suddenly vanished present with a long-vanished past, the path taken with those untaken, regret with acceptance--and, often, a bitter but somehow salutary solitude.