settler


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Financial, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

set·tler

 (sĕt′lər)
n.
1. One who settles in a new region, especially a region that has few occupants or that is occupied by people of a different ethnic or religious group.
2. One who settles or decides something.
3. Law Variant of settlor.

settler

(ˈsɛtlə)
n
a person who settles in a new country or a colony

set•tler

(ˈsɛt lər, ˈsɛt l ər)

n.
1. a person or thing that settles.
2. a person who settles in a new country or area.
[1590–1600]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.settler - a person who settles in a new colony or moves into new countrysettler - a person who settles in a new colony or moves into new country
migrant, migrator - traveler who moves from one region or country to another
Pilgrim Father, Pilgrim - one of the colonists from England who sailed to America on the Mayflower and founded the colony of Plymouth in New England in 1620
pioneer - one the first colonists or settlers in a new territory; "they went west as pioneers with only the possessions they could carry with them"
sourdough - a settler or prospector (especially in western United States or northwest Canada and Alaska)
homesteader, nester, squatter - someone who settles lawfully on government land with the intent to acquire title to it
2.settler - a negotiator who settles disputes
negotiant, negotiator, treater - someone who negotiates (confers with others in order to reach a settlement)
3.settler - a clerk in a betting shop who calculates the winnings
Britain, Great Britain, U.K., UK, United Kingdom, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland - a monarchy in northwestern Europe occupying most of the British Isles; divided into England and Scotland and Wales and Northern Ireland; `Great Britain' is often used loosely to refer to the United Kingdom
clerk - an employee who performs clerical work (e.g., keeps records or accounts)

settler

noun colonist, immigrant, pioneer, colonizer, frontiersman settlers from the Volga region
Translations
مُسْتَوْطِن
osadník
bosætternybygger
telepes
landnemi
naseljenec

settler

[ˈsetləʳ] Ncolonizador(a) m/f

settler

[ˈsɛtlər] ncolon mset-to [ˈsɛttuː] n (= quarrel) → prise f de bec set-top box nterminal m numérique

settler

nSiedler(in) m(f)

settler

[ˈsɛtləʳ] ncolonizzatore/trice

settle

(ˈsetl) verb
1. to place in a position of rest or comfort. I settled myself in the armchair.
2. to come to rest. Dust had settled on the books.
3. to soothe. I gave him a pill to settle his nerves.
4. to go and live. Many Scots settled in New Zealand.
5. to reach a decision or agreement. Have you settled with the builders when they are to start work?; The dispute between management and employees is still not settled.
6. to pay (a bill).
ˈsettlement noun
1. an agreement. The two sides have at last reached a settlement.
2. a small community. a farming settlement.
ˈsettler noun
a person who settles in a country that is being newly populated. They were among the early settlers on the east coast of America.
settle down
1. to (cause to) become quiet, calm and peaceful. He waited for the audience to settle down before he spoke; She settled the baby down at last.
2. to make oneself comfortable. She settled (herself) down in the back of the car and went to sleep.
3. to begin to concentrate on something, eg work. He settled down to (do) his schoolwork.
settle in
to become used to and comfortable in new surroundings.
settle on
to agree about or decide.
settle up
to pay (a bill). He asked the waiter for the bill, and settled up.
References in classic literature ?
AN Indian who had been driven out of a fertile valley by a White Settler, said:
The bee hunter is generally some settler on the verge of the prairies; a long, lank fellow, of fever and ague complexion, acquired from living on new soil, and in a hut built of green logs.
We can imagine, therefore, that among such folk a settler, of Aeolic origin like Hesiod, who clearly was well acquainted with the Ionian epos, would naturally see that the only outlet for his gifts lay in applying epic poetry to new themes acceptable to his hearers.
Again, perhaps, Nature will try, with me for a first settler, and my house raised last spring to be the oldest in the hamlet.
Though I have spent some years, in this quarter, I can hardly be called a settler, seeing that I have no regular abode, and seldom pass more than a month, at a time, on the same range.
To the peasants of old times, the world outside their own direct experience was a region of vagueness and mystery: to their untravelled thought a state of wandering was a conception as dim as the winter life of the swallows that came back with the spring; and even a settler, if he came from distant parts, hardly ever ceased to be viewed with a remnant of distrust, which would have prevented any surprise if a long course of inoffensive conduct on his part had ended in the commission of a crime; especially if he had any reputation for knowledge, or showed any skill in handicraft.
As we pass this clearing, the settler leans upon his axe or hammer, and looks wistfully at the people from the world.
Peter Palfrey, Roger Conant, and one or two more had built houses there in 1626, and may be considered as the first settlers of that ancient town.
The face of the country, the climate as it was found by the whites, and the manners of the settlers, are described with a minuteness for which the author has no other apology than the force of his own recollections.
The aborigines are always anxious to borrow the dogs from the farm-houses: the use of them, the offal when an animal is killed, and some milk from the cows, are the peace-offerings of the settlers, who push farther and farther towards the interior.
They had been the settlers of thirteen separate and distinct English colonies, along the margin of the shore of the North American Continent; contiguously situated, but chartered by adventurers of characters variously diversified, including sectarians, religious and political, of all the classes which for the two preceding centuries had agitated and divided the people of the British islands--and with them were intermingled the descendants of Hollanders, Swedes, Germans, and French fugitives from the persecution of the revoker of the Edict of Nantes.
In old times the settlers used to be astounded by the inroads of the northern Indians coming down upon them from this mountain rampart through some defile known only to themselves.