sexton


Also found in: Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to sexton: Anne Sexton

sex·ton

 (sĕk′stən)
n.
An employee or officer of a church who is responsible for the care and upkeep of church property and sometimes for ringing bells and digging graves.

[Middle English sextein, from Anglo-Latin sextānus, probably from Medieval Latin secristānus, sacristan, variant of sacristānus; see sacristan.]

sexton

(ˈsɛkstən)
n
1. (Ecclesiastical Terms) a person employed to act as caretaker of a church and its contents and graveyard, and often also as bell-ringer, gravedigger, etc
2. (Animals) another name for the burying beetle
[C14: from Old French secrestein, from Medieval Latin sacristānus sacristan]

sex•ton

(ˈsɛk stən)

n.
1. an official who maintains a church building and its contents, rings the bell, etc.
2. an official whose main duty is to maintain a synagogue and its religious articles.
[1275–1325; Middle English sexteyn, sekesteyn, syncopated variant of segerstane, secristeyn < Anglo-French segerstaine sacristan]
sex′ton•ship`, n.

Sex•ton

(ˈsɛk stən)

n.
Anne (Harvey), 1928–74, U.S. poet.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Sexton - United States poet (1928-1974)
2.sexton - an officer of the church who is in charge of sacred objects
caretaker - a custodian who is hired to take care of something (property or a person)
church officer - a church official
Translations
قَنْدَلَفْت
kostelník
kirketjener
suntio
egyházfisekrestyés
kirkjuòjónn
zakristijonas
ķesteris
kostolník
kilise çancısızangoç

sexton

[ˈsekstən] Nsacristán m

sexton

nKüster m

sexton

[ˈsɛkstn] nsagrestano

sexton

(ˈsekstən) noun
a person who looks after a church and often is responsible for bellringing etc.
References in classic literature ?
And this garden, where the black mould always clings to my spade, as if I were a sexton delving in a graveyard
He now dug into the poor clergyman's heart, like a miner searching for gold; or, rather, like a sexton delving into a grave, possibly in quest of a jewel that had been buried on the dead man's bosom, but likely to find nothing save mortality and corruption.
And I bribed the sexton to pull it away when I'm laid there, and slide mine out too; I'll have it made so: and then by the time Linton gets to us he'll not know which is which
The farmer's wife and the sexton sat at the table, but there was no one else.
And yet I can laugh at her very grave, laugh when the clay from the spade of the sexton drop upon her coffin and say `Thud, thud
The sexton stands waiting for us at the door of the tomb.
You go on doing your duty, as parish clerk and sexton, as well as you've always done it, and making those capital thick boots for your neighbours, and things won't go far wrong in Hayslope, depend upon it.
The party huddled together in a little crowd as they repaired homeward, particularly when they passed a lonely field where a man had been murdered, and even the sexton, who had to complete his journey alone, though accustomed, one would think, to ghosts and goblins, went a long way round rather than pass by his own churchyard.
Before long the sexton came by and saw his master, the parson, running behind three girls.
So the baby was carried in a small deal box, under an ancient woman's shawl, to the churchyard that night, and buried by lantern-light, at the cost of a shilling and a pint of beer to the sexton, in that shabby corner of God's allotment where He lets the nettles grow, and where all unbaptized infants, notorious drunkards, suicides, and others of the conjecturally damned are laid.
Newland Archer, at a signal from the sexton, had come out of the vestry and placed himself with his best man on the chancel step of Grace Church.
Kenge and Carboy will have something to say about it; Master Somebody--a sort of ridiculous sexton, digging graves for the merits of causes in a back room at the end of Quality Court, Chancery Lane--will have something to say about it; counsel will have something to say about it; the Chancellor will have something to say about it; the satellites will have something to say about it; they will all have to be handsomely feed, all round, about it; the whole thing will be vastly ceremonious, wordy, unsatisfactory, and expensive, and I call it, in general, wiglomeration.