shades


Also found in: Thesaurus, Legal, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to shades: Lowes

shade

 (shād)
n.
1. Light diminished in intensity as a result of the interception of the rays; partial darkness.
2. Cover or shelter provided by interception by an object of the sun or its rays: sat in the shade under the tree.
3. The part of a picture or photograph depicting darkness or shadow.
4.
a. A gradation of a color as it is mixed with black or is decreasingly illuminated: shades of gray.
b. A slight difference or variation; a nuance: shades of meaning. See Synonyms at nuance.
c. A small amount; a trace: detected a shade of bitterness in her remarks.
5.
a. Any of various devices used to reduce or screen light or heat: closed the window shades.
b. shades Informal Sunglasses.
6. shades
a. Dark shadows gathering at dusk: "The shades of night are falling fast" (Henry Wadsworth Longfellow).
b. The abode of the dead; the underworld: went to the shades of hell.
7.
a. A disembodied spirit; a ghost.
b. shades A present reminder of a person or situation in the past: shades of my high-school days.
v. shad·ed, shad·ing, shades
v.tr.
1. To screen from light or heat: Trees shaded the street.
2. To obscure or darken: "A sliver of mustache shaded his upper lip" (Michael Finkel).
3.
a. To represent degrees of shade or shadow in: shade a drawing.
b. To produce (gradations of light or color) in a drawing or picture: shaded the pink in the sunset.
4. To change or vary by slight degrees: shade the meaning.
5. To make a slight reduction in: shade prices.
v.intr.
To pass from one quality, color, or thing to another by very slight changes or degrees.
Idiom:
a shade
A little bit; slightly: a sprinter who was a shade quicker that the rest.

[Middle English, from Old English sceadu.]

shad′er n.

shades

(ʃeɪdz)
pl n
1. gathering darkness at nightfall
2. (Clothing & Fashion) a slang word for sunglasses
3. (Classical Myth & Legend) the shades (often capital) a literary term for Hades
4. (foll by of) undertones or suggestions: shades of my father!.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.shades - spectacles that are darkened or polarized to protect the eyes from the glare of the sunshades - spectacles that are darkened or polarized to protect the eyes from the glare of the sun; "he was wearing a pair of mirrored shades"
Polaroid - (trade mark) a plastic film that can polarize a beam of light; often used in sunglasses to eliminate glare
eyeglasses, glasses, specs, spectacles - optical instrument consisting of a frame that holds a pair of lenses for correcting defective vision
plural, plural form - the form of a word that is used to denote more than one
Translations
نَظارات شَمْس
brýle proti slunci
solbriller
sólgleraugu

shade

(ʃeid) noun
1. slight darkness caused by the blocking of some light. I prefer to sit in the shade rather than the sun.
2. the dark parts of a picture. light and shade in a portrait.
3. something that screens or shelters from light or heat. a large sunshade; a shade for a light.
4. a variety of a colour; a slight difference. a pretty shade of green; shades of meaning.
5. a slight amount. The weather is a shade better today.
verb
1. (sometimes with from) to shelter from light or heat. He put up his hand to shade his eyes.
2. to make darker. You should shade the foreground of that drawing.
3. (with into) to change very gradually eg from one colour to another.
ˈshaded adjective
(of parts of a picture) made darker.
shades noun plural
(especially American) sunglasses.
ˈshading noun
(in a picture etc) the marking that shows the darker parts.
ˈshady adjective
1. sheltered or giving shelter from heat or light. a shady tree; a shady corner of the garden.
2. dishonest. a shady business.
ˈshadiness noun
put in the shade
to cause to seem unimportant. She is so beautiful that she puts her sister in the shade.
References in classic literature ?
ONE pleasant day in the latter part of eternity, as the Shades of all the great writers were reposing upon beds of asphodel and moly in the Elysian fields, each happy in hearing from the lips of the others nothing but copious quotation from his own works (for so Jove had kindly bedeviled their ears), there came in among them with triumphant mien a Shade whom none knew.
Other shades now came down by the same way by which the door-shutters had gone up.
The Fiend lookt up and knew His mounted scale aloft: nor more; but fled Murmuring, and with him fled the shades of night.
Thus seated, it was a sublime spectacle to watch the shades of night gradually obscuring the last and highest pinnacles.
But the unconscious Mr Clare had gone indoors, and they saw him no more; and, the shades beginning to deepen, they crept into their beds.
Julius Schmidt pretends that, if the terrestrial oceans were dried up, a Selenite observer could not distinguish on the globe a greater diversity of shades between the oceans and the continental plains than those on the moon present to a terrestrial observer.
The truth must have been that, all unversed in the arts of the wily Greek, the deceiver of gods, the lover of strange women, the evoker of bloodthirsty shades, I yet longed for the beginning of my own obscure Odyssey, which, as was proper for a modern, should unroll its wonders and terrors beyond the Pillars of Hercules.
The shade of the trees fell heavily upon the water, and seemed to bury itself therein, impregnating the depths of the element with darkness.
As they rested under its shade, one of the Travelers said to the other, "What a singularly useless tree is the Plane
I shall see a straight line DAE, in which the middle point (A) will be very bright because it is nearest to me; but on either side the line will shade away RAPIDLY INTO DIMNESS, because the sides AC and AB RECEDE RAPIDLY INTO THE FOG and what appear to me as the Merchant's extremities, viz.
After journeying on foot from sunrise till nearly noon of a summer's day, his weariness and the increasing heat determined him to sit down in the first convenient shade, and await the coming up of the stage-coach.
The cut-glass shade is a weak invention of the enemy.