shake up


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shake

 (shāk)
v. shook (sho͝ok), shak·en (shā′kən), shak·ing, shakes
v.tr.
1.
a. To cause to move from side to side or up and down with jerky movements: I shook the juice container.
b. To cause to tremble, vibrate, or rock: The earthquake shook the ground. The wind shook the barley.
c. To brandish or wave, especially in anger: shake one's fist.
2.
a. To cause to lose stability or strength, as of conviction: a crisis that has shaken my deepest beliefs.
b. To disturb or agitate emotionally; upset or unnerve: She was shaken by the news of the disaster.
3.
a. To remove or dislodge by jerky movements: shook the dust from the cushions.
b. To scatter or strew by jerky movements: shook the salt on the popcorn.
c. To get rid of or put an end to: could not shake the feeling that things would not work out; wanted to shake his habit of snacking.
d. To get away from (a pursuer): couldn't shake the man who was following us.
e. To bring to a specified condition by or as if by shaking: "It is not easy to shake one's heart free of the impression" (John Middleton Murry).
4. To clasp (hands) in greeting or leave-taking or as a sign of agreement.
5. Music To trill (a note).
6. Games To rattle and mix (dice) before casting.
v.intr.
1. To move from side to side or up and down in short, irregular, often jerky movements: The trees shook in the wind.
2. To move something vigorously up and down or from side to side, as in mixing.
3. To tremble, as from cold or in anger.
4. To be unsteady; totter or waver.
5. Music To trill.
6. To shake hands: Let's shake on it.
n.
1. The act of shaking: gave the bottle a shake.
2. A trembling or quivering movement.
3. Informal An earthquake.
4.
a. A fissure in rock.
b. A crack in timber caused by wind or frost.
5. Informal A moment or instant: I'll do it in a shake.
6. Music A trill.
7.
a. See milkshake.
b. A beverage in which the ingredients are mixed by shaking.
8. A rough shingle used to cover rustic buildings, such as barns: cedar shakes.
9. shakes Informal Uncontrollable trembling, as in a person who is cold, frightened, feverish, or ill. Often used with the: was suffering from a bad case of the shakes.
10. Informal A bargain or deal: getting a fair shake.
Phrasal Verbs:
shake down
1. Slang To extort money from.
2. Slang To make a thorough search of: shook down the prisoners' cells for hidden weapons.
3. To subject (a new ship or aircraft) to shakedown testing.
4. To become acclimated or accustomed, as to a new environment or a new job.
shake off
To free oneself of; get rid of: We shook off our fears.
shake out
1. To come to pass; transpire; happen: Let's see how things shake out before we finalize our plans.
2. To straighten or extend by jerky movements: She took off her hat and shook out her hair.
shake up
1. To upset by or as if by a physical jolt or shock: was badly shaken up by the accident.
2. To subject to a drastic rearrangement or reorganization: new management bent on shaking up the company.
Idioms:
give (someone) the shake Slang
To escape from or get rid of: We managed to give our pursuers the shake.
no great shakes Slang
Unexceptional; ordinary: "stepping in between the victim and the bully, even when the victim happens to be no great shakes" (Louis Auchincloss).
shake a leg Informal
1. To dance.
2. To move quickly; hurry up.
shake (someone's) tree Slang
To arouse to action or reaction; disturb: "[He] so shook Hollywood's tree that ... all manner of ... people called me unsolicited to itemize his mistakes or praise his courage" (Tina Brown).
shake a stick at Slang
To point out, designate, or name: "All of a sudden there came into being a vast conservative infrastructure: think-tanks ... and more foundations than you could shake a stick at" (National Review).

[Middle English schaken, from Old English sceacan.]

shak′a·ble, shake′a·ble adj.
Synonyms: shake, tremble, quake, quiver1, shiver1, shudder
These verbs mean to manifest involuntary back-and-forth or up-and-down movement. Shake is the most general: My hand shook as I signed the mortgage. Tremble implies quick, rather slight movement, as from excitement, weakness, or anger: The speaker trembled as he denounced his opponents. Quake refers to more violent movement, as that caused by shock or upheaval: I was so scared that my legs began to quake. Quiver suggests a slight, rapid, tremulous movement: "Her lip quivered like that of a child about to cry" (Booth Tarkington).
Shiver involves rapid trembling, as of a person experiencing chill: "as I in hoary winter night stood shivering in the snow" (Robert Southwell).
Shudder applies chiefly to convulsive shaking caused by fear, horror, or revulsion: "She starts like one that spies an adder / ... The fear whereof doth make him shake and shudder" (Shakespeare). See Also Synonyms at agitate.

shake up

vb (tr, adverb)
1. to shake or agitate in order to mix
2. to reorganize drastically
3. to stir or rouse
4. to restore the shape of (a pillow, cushion, etc)
5. informal to disturb or shock mentally or physically
n
informal a radical or drastic reorganization
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.shake up - shock physically; "Georgia was shaken up in the Tech game"
move, displace - cause to move or shift into a new position or place, both in a concrete and in an abstract sense; "Move those boxes into the corner, please"; "I'm moving my money to another bank"; "The director moved more responsibilities onto his new assistant"
2.shake up - organize anew; "We must reorganize the company if we don't want to go under"
organize, organise - cause to be structured or ordered or operating according to some principle or idea
retool, revise - revise or reorganize, especially for the purpose of updating and improving; "We must retool the town's economy"
3.shake up - shake; especially (a patient to detect fluids or air in the body)
shake, agitate - move or cause to move back and forth; "The chemist shook the flask vigorously"; "My hands were shaking"
4.shake up - stir the feelings, emotions, or peace of; "These stories shook the community"; "the civil war shook the country"
arouse, elicit, evoke, provoke, enkindle, kindle, fire, raise - call forth (emotions, feelings, and responses); "arouse pity"; "raise a smile"; "evoke sympathy"
fuel - stimulate; "fuel the debate on creationism"
sex, wind up, excite, turn on, arouse - stimulate sexually; "This movie usually arouses the male audience"
affright, fright, frighten, scare - cause fear in; "The stranger who hangs around the building frightens me"; "Ghosts could never affright her"
thrill, tickle, vibrate - feel sudden intense sensation or emotion; "he was thrilled by the speed and the roar of the engine"
invite, tempt - give rise to a desire by being attractive or inviting; "the window displays tempted the shoppers"
elate, intoxicate, uplift, lift up, pick up - fill with high spirits; fill with optimism; "Music can uplift your spirits"
animate, enliven, inspire, invigorate, exalt - heighten or intensify; "These paintings exalt the imagination"
titillate - excite pleasurably or erotically; "A titillating story appeared in the usually conservative magazine"
5.shake up - change the arrangement or position ofshake up - change the arrangement or position of
scramble, beat - stir vigorously; "beat the egg whites"; "beat the cream"
toss - agitate; "toss the salad"
rile, roil - make turbid by stirring up the sediments of
poke - stir by poking; "poke the embers in the fireplace"
move, displace - cause to move or shift into a new position or place, both in a concrete and in an abstract sense; "Move those boxes into the corner, please"; "I'm moving my money to another bank"; "The director moved more responsibilities onto his new assistant"
6.shake up - make fuller by shaking; "fluff up the pillows"
shake, agitate - move or cause to move back and forth; "The chemist shook the flask vigorously"; "My hands were shaking"

shake

verb
1. To cause to move to and fro with short, jerky movements:
2. To move to and fro in short, jerky movements:
3. To cause to move to and fro violently:
4. To move to and fro violently:
5. To alter the settled state or position of:
6. Slang. To free from or cast out something objectionable or undesirable:
7. Slang. To get away from (a pursuer):
Idiom: give someone the shake.
8. To impair or destroy the composure of.Also used with up:
Informal: rattle.
9. To deprive of courage or the power to act as a result of fear, anxiety, or disgust:
phrasal verb
shake down
1. Slang. To obtain by coercion or intimidation:
3. Slang. To examine the person or personal effects of in order to find something lost or concealed:
phrasal verb
shake off
1. To free from or cast out something objectionable or undesirable:
Slang: shake.
2. To get away from (a pursuer):
Slang: shake.
Idiom: give someone the shake.
noun
1. A nervous shaking of the body:
2. Informal. A shaking of the earth:
3. Informal. A state of nervous restlessness or agitation.Used in plural:
fidget (often used in plural), jitter (used in plural), jump (used in plural), shiver (used in plural), tremble (often used in plural).
Informal: all-overs.
Translations
يُثير، يُقْلِق، يَهُز المَشاعِر
vyburcovat
ruske op i
hrista upp í
vyburcovať
yeniden düzenlemek/örgütlemek

w>shake up

vt sep
bottle, liquidschütteln
(= upset)erschüttern; he was badly shaken up by the accidentder Unfall hat ihm einen schweren Schock versetzt; she’s still a bit shaken upsie ist immer noch ziemlich mitgenommen
management, recruitsauf Zack bringen (inf); ideasrevidieren; systemumkrempeln (inf); country, industrywachrütteln; your ideas could do with a bit of shaking updeine Ansichten müssten auch mal wieder revidiert werden; to shake things updie Dinge in Bewegung bringen

shake

(ʃeik) past tense shook (ʃuk) : past participle shaken verb
1. to (cause to) tremble or move with jerks. The explosion shook the building; We were shaking with laughter; Her voice shook as she told me the sad news.
2. to shock, disturb or weaken. He was shaken by the accident; My confidence in him has been shaken.
noun
1. an act of shaking. He gave the bottle a shake.
2. drink made by shaking the ingredients together vigorously. a chocolate milk-shake.
ˈshaking noun
an act of shaking or state of being shaken, shocked etc. They got a shaking in the crash.
ˈshaky adjective
1. weak or trembling with age, illness etc. a shaky voice; shaky handwriting.
2. unsteady or likely to collapse. a shaky chair.
3. (sometimes with at) not very good, accurate etc. He's a bit shaky at arithmetic; My arithmetic has always been very shaky; I'd be grateful if you would correct my rather shaky spelling.
ˈshakily adverb
ˈshakiness noun
ˈshake-up noun
a disturbance or reorganization.
no great shakes
not very good or important. He has written a book, but it's no great shakes.
shake one's fist at
to hold up one's fist as though threatening to punch. He shook his fist at me when I drove into the back of his car.
shake one's head
to move one's head round to left and right to mean `No'. `Are you coming?' I asked. She shook her head.
shake off
to rid oneself of. He soon shook off the illness.
shake up
to disturb or rouse (people) so as to make them more energetic.
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